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Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
updated: 12/09/2011
website: LoCurto-outcault.com
 
   
 
 
     
 
Artwork Title
art-medium
art-year
dimensions
Click thumbnails for full view:
 
telamon[1]
telamon[2]
telamon[3]
telamon[4]
telamon[5]
telamon[6]
telamon[7]
telamon[8]
telamon[9]
telamon[10]
 
Portfolio Keywords:  anatomy, collaborative, figurative, mapping, technology, violence
 
 
telamon[1] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[1]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[2] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[2]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[3] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[3]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[4] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[4]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[5] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[5]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[6] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[6]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[7] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[7]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[8] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[8]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[9] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[9]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 
telamon[10] by Lilla LoCurto/ Bill Outcault
telamon[10]
pigment print
2009
24 " x  34 " 

Artist Statement

Photography fixes a moment in time. The camera's position at the instant the photograph is taken is as firmly frozen as the subject's due to the lens' solitary point of view. We began to challenge this paradigm several years ago by working with a three-dimensional scanner and using it as a camera. Because its lens surrounds the subject it provides an unlimited number of viewpoints. This ability, providing the simultaneity sought by the Cubists, removes the camera from the constraints of time, and allows us to move the camera around the subject, thus choreographing moving images, or animations, from still objects.

The frailty of the human body has been an ongoing theme in our work and in manipulating it we often fragment and reorder its parts. We began this after noticing a utility application in the scanner that horizontally traced the external contours of a scanned body, creating what to us appeared to be liquid drawings. From this, we developed software that allowed us to, among other things, similarly make slices from the figures and to control their thickness and attitude. Because only external information is recorded the figures are hollow, and in sectioning them they become ribbons of flesh. These calligraphic shards of sliced figures are meant to emphasize our human vulnerability. The hollowness of the whole figures contributes to a sense of derealization, the feeling that nothing is real, and at the same time the shredding of the figures makes them anonymous and universal.

We use the computer as a drawing tool, developing techniques and at times software where the drawing can take place in virtual space. They are extracted moments from the animations, built from many layers, and revisited from multiple perspectives at the same instant in time. Although the source of our work has its origin essentially in photography, the nature of our medium allows us to manipulate it not only photographically and cinematically but also as a drawing.

 

Artist Bio / CV
SOLO EXHIBITIONS:
2006 [un] moving pictures, S. Dorsky Mus. of Art, SUNY New Paltz, NY
2004 thinskinned, Carleton College, Northfield, MN
2002 selfportrait.map, Mary and Leigh Block Mus., Northwestern Univ.
Bellevue Art Mus., Bellevue, WA
2001 Frederieke Taylor gallery, NY, selfportrait.map,
Hatton Gallery, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins,
Lyman Allyn Art Mus., New London, CT
2000 selfportrait.map, MIT List Visual Arts Center, MA,
Ringling School of Art, Sarasota, FL
1997 Cossos Exquisits, Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona, Spain
1995 Skin Deep, TZ'Art & Company, NY
1994 Sharp Appetites & Mandala, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA
GROUP EXHIBITIONS:
2007 Solos Ringling School of Art, Sarasota, FL
2006 Human Nature, Indiana Univ., Bloomington, traveled to
Indiana Univ. Kokomo Art Gallery, Kokomo
New Art. New York: Reflections on the Human Condition, Trierenberg AG, Traun, Austria
2005 Figuratively Speaking, Ross Art Mus., Delaware, Ohio
2002 Situated Realities, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, Maryland
2001 Digital: Printmaking Now, Brooklyn Mus. of Art, NY
1996 Contemporaneou.s.,Newlyn Art Gallery, Penzance, UK
1993 About Place, LAX: T. Los Angeles Exhibition, L.A. Municipal Art Gallery
1992 Corporal Politics, MIT List Visual Arts Center, MA
PUBLICATIONS:
2006 Patricia C. Phillips, [un] moving pictures, S. Dorsky Mus. of Art, SUNY New Paltz, NY
Helaine Posner, Self Portraits for a New Millennium, Art Journal, Spring
2000 Posner, Helaine & Gelernter, David, selfportrait.map, Univ. of Washington Press, Seattle and London
1997 Barenblit, Ferran, Cossos Exquisits, Fundaciò Joan Mirò, Barcelona, Spain
1996 Ash, Emily, Contemporaneou.s., New Work from New York, Newlyn Art Gallery, Penzance, UK
1992 Hall, Donald; Laquer, Thomas; Posner, Helaine, Corporal Politics, MIT, MA