My Account My Lightboxes Create Account Submissions Guidelines Help
[ ARTIST ARCHIVE ]
  ARTIST PORTFOLIO  
 
elin o'Hara slavick
updated: 10/26/2009
website: www.unc.edu/~eoslavic
 
   
 
 
     
 
Artwork Title
art-medium
art-year
dimensions
Click thumbnails for full view:
 
World Map, with Flag Pins marking each place the U.S. has bombed for which there is a corresponding drawing, 1854-Ongoing
Amchitka Island, Alaska, U.S., 1965-1971
Baghdad, Iraq, 1990-Ongoing
The Belgian Congo, Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1960-64
Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, U.S., 1942-Ongoing
El Salvador, 1980-1994
Korea, 1950-53
Lebanon, 1983-84 and 2006
Shifa Pharmeceutical Plant, Khartou, Sudan, 1998
Haiti, 1959
 
Portfolio Keywords:  information, mapping, political, violence, abstract, social criticism, conceptual, documentary, feminist, historical
 
 
World Map, with Flag Pins marking each place the U.S. has bombed for which there is a corresponding drawing, 1854-Ongoing by elin o'Hara slavick
World Map, with Flag Pins marking each place the U.S. has bombed for which there is a corresponding drawing, 1854-Ongoing
ink, watercolor, gouache and flag pins on Arches paper
2006
22" x  30" 
Amchitka Island, Alaska, U.S., 1965-1971 by elin o'Hara slavick
Amchitka Island, Alaska, U.S., 1965-1971
Ink, watercolor, gouache on Arches Papes
2006
22" x  30" 
Baghdad, Iraq, 1990-Ongoing by elin o'Hara slavick
Baghdad, Iraq, 1990-Ongoing
Ink, watercolor, acrylic on Arches paper
1999
30" x  22" 
The Belgian Congo, Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1960-64 by elin o'Hara slavick
The Belgian Congo, Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1960-64
Ink, watercolor, gouache, chalk on Arches paper
2000
22" x  30" 
Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, U.S., 1942-Ongoing by elin o'Hara slavick
Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, U.S., 1942-Ongoing
Acrylic, resist, gouache
2004
30" x  20" 
El Salvador, 1980-1994 by elin o'Hara slavick
El Salvador, 1980-1994
Ink, watercolor, gouache, colored pencil on Arches paper
2000
22" x  30" 
Korea, 1950-53 by elin o'Hara slavick
Korea, 1950-53
Ink, watercolor, color pencil, chalk on Arches paper
2000
30" x  22" 
Lebanon, 1983-84 and 2006 by elin o'Hara slavick
Lebanon, 1983-84 and 2006
Ink, watercolor, color pencil, goauche on Arches paper
2003
30" x  22" 
Shifa Pharmeceutical Plant, Khartou, Sudan, 1998 by elin o'Hara slavick
Shifa Pharmeceutical Plant, Khartou, Sudan, 1998
Ink, gouache, acrylic on Arches paper
1999
22" x  30" 
Haiti, 1959 by elin o'Hara slavick
Haiti, 1959
Ink, color pencil on Arches paper
2003
22" x  30" 

Artist Statement

Protesting Cartography or Places the United States has Bombed

1998 - 2005

“History is amoral: events occurred. But memory is moral; what we consciously remember

is what our conscience remembers. If one no longer has land but has memory of land,

then one can make a map.” - Anne Michaels, Fugitive Pieces

These drawings are manifestations of self-education on the subjects of U.S. military interventions, geography, politics, history, cartography, and the language of war. The drawings are also a means to educate others. I make them beautiful to seduce the viewer so that she will take a closer look, read the accompanying information that explains the horror beneath the surface. I wish for the viewer to be captured by the colors and lost in the patterns—as one would be if viewing an Impressionist painting—and then have the optical pleasure interrupted by the very real dots, or bombs, that make up the drawing. Unlike an Impressionist painting, there is no sense of light in these drawings. And unlike typical landscape paintings, these drawings are based on surveillance, military, and aerial photography and maps.

Miles Harvey writes, “For early humans, mapping may have served to achieve what in modern behavioral therapy is known as desensitization: lessening fear by the repeated representation of what is feared. Representing supposedly dangerous terrae incognitae in map form as an extension of familiar territory may well have served to lessen fear of the peripheral world." I suppose I want to instill fear back in to us, but not fear of the peripheral world. We should be afraid of ourselves. Maps are preeminently a language of power, not protest. I offer these maps as protests against each and every bombing.

This project is the subject of a new book, Bomb After Bomb: A Violent Cartography, with a foreword by historian Howard Zinn and essays by art historian Carol Mavor and anthropologist Catherine Lutz (Charta, 2007).

Artist Bio / CV
Elin o’Hara slavick is a Professor of Art at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she teaches Conceptual Photography, Collaborative Visual Projects, Drawing, Mixed Media and Body Imaging. Slavick received her MFA in Photography from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her BA in poetry, photography and art history from Sarah Lawrence College. Having grown up with a radical Catholic activist father who gave her a camera when she was eight years old and a German mother who encouraged her to draw, slavick traveled extensively throughout Europe and the United States many times as a child - visiting churches, museums, typical tourist destinations, alternative historical sites, and family. Perhaps these trips began her visual explorations and manifestations of the complicated and critical relationship between the individual and the world, between the local and the global, the personal and political. Slavick has exhibited her work in Hong Kong, Canada, France, Italy, Scotland, England, Cuba, the Netherlands and across the United States. A determined feminist, educator and activist, slavick hopes to see the transformation of global capitalism into some more equitable and democratic form before she dies.