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Joshua Caleb Weibley
updated: 06/01/2013
website: www.thebestrevenge.info
 
   
 
 
     
 
Artwork Title
art-medium
art-year
dimensions
Click thumbnails for full view:
 
Klondike
Klondike
Sketch A for Klondike
System Plan for Card Edition
Preparatory Sketch for Card Edition
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
 
Portfolio Keywords:  mimetic, conceptual, domestic, humor, consumer culture, language, meditative, systems, pattern, obsessive
 
 
Klondike by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Klondike
Editioned Playing Cards in Corian Frame
2013
15.5 " x  27.5 "  x 1.5 " 
Klondike by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Klondike
Editioned Playing Cards in Corian Frame
2013
15.5" x  27.5"  x 1.5" 
Sketch A for Klondike by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Sketch A for Klondike
Ink on Paper with Tape and Staple
2012
8.5 " x  11 " 
System Plan for Card Edition by Joshua Caleb Weibley
System Plan for Card Edition
Ink on Paper
2012
11 " x  8.5 " 
Preparatory Sketch for Card Edition by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Preparatory Sketch for Card Edition
Ink on Paper
2012
11 " x  8.5 " 
Card by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Card
Editioned Playing Card
2012
3.5 " x  2.5 " 
Card by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Card
Editioned Playing Card
2012
3.5 " x  2.5 " 
Card by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Card
Editioned Playing Card
2012
3.5 " x  2.5 " 
Card by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Card
Editioned Playing Card
2012
3.5 " x  2.5 " 
Card by Joshua Caleb Weibley
Card
Editioned Playing Card
2012
3.5 " x  2.5 " 

Artist Statement

In 1990 the release of Microsoft Windows 3.0 came with a virtual version of Klondike Solitaire (simply called “Solitaire”). In 1995, it would be joined by another kind of solitaire, FreeCell, with the release of Windows 95 and Spider Solitaire would also be added (along with the card game, Hearts) to Windows 98. These games were included to train users in the point-and-click/drag-and-drop functionality of the operating system’s cursor, socializing them for work by play. There are many more Solitaire games than those that have accompanied Windows releases and they are sometimes (very appropriately) called “patience” games. 

The on-going work “Double Solitaire” emerges from meditation on

1) the medium of drawing,

2) the production ideology of Minimal art,

3) the language play of Conceptual art and

4) the optical mechanics of Op art.

My reading of these things locates shared moments between them that require an individual perspective; the work’s central question is what kinds of public relevance private experiences can have. This is filtered through the metaphor of solitaire play and has an open, broad relevance for countless activities in life.

These ideas are presented in “Double Solitaire” as if placed onto a table for consideration. Framed decks of editioned playing cards—made using a print-on-demand service in China—are laid out in mats as if prepared for an array of solitaire variations. Their frames are made from varieties of a commercial countertop material called Solid Surface and literal tables made from the same material accompany the framed decks.