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Yuri Masnyj

Harold Mendez

//I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka)//, Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014 //I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka)//, Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014 //I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka)//, Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014

I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka), Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014

Nyeema Morgan

//"obviously God"//, Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012 //"obviously God"//, Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012 //"obviously God"//, Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012

"obviously God", Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012

I develop my art practice within an interdisciplinary framework that explores the personal and cultural economy of knowledge through familiar artifacts. My works, which have included large-scale drawings, installations, sculpture and printed matter, are inspired by philosophical conflicts that arise in our everyday encounters with images, objects and information. Through these works I attempt call into question information’s conceptual and hierarchical value, challenge the boundaries of authoritative reasoning as well as make evident my own implications within a larger socio-political drama.

Artist's website

Laura Morrison

//Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters//, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014 //Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters//, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014 //Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters//, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014

Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014

Laura Morrison is interested in instances of vulnerability and accountability. She draws anecdotes from her personal and professional life and other fictions for elaboration in both writing and material gesture. Her recent work in texts, quick watercolours and large, plasticine reliefs propose awkwardly layered clichés and binaries: big and small – dumb and clever – soft and rigid - visible or discrete - hateful and caring. Morrison considers drawing to be inherent to the tangible gestures in her work and the way she paces a text, but equally in relation to a political notion of line, lineage, generationality, social and power relations and how those threads are explicitly drawn through her work.

Artist's website

Marcelo Moscheta

//POULIGUEN//, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011 //POULIGUEN//, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011 //POULIGUEN//, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011

POULIGUEN, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011

Displacement, Territory, Landscape and Location are my main interests.
I have made installations, drawings and photographs born from my time in remote locations.
Through uncommon materials and techniques my works addresses the notion of ephemerality and mankind's efforts to understand and recreate physical and geographical aspects found in natural environments.

Artist's website

Matt Neff

//Lambent//, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014 
//Lambent//, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014 
//Lambent//, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014

Lambent, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014

More than the application of a specific medium or hand to a surface, I have come to think about drawing as a way of seeing. I began my career as an artist in traditional and architectural drawing, and it has been my facility with this medium that has allowed me to experiment with different drawing strategies, and ultimately, different mediums and disciplines. As my work has continued to develop and expand, drawing has, in many ways, remained the framework for how I approach materials. When I make sculptures, photographs, or prints, they are embedded with an underlying matrix or scaffolding in their form. This broad conceptualization of drawing is also reflected in the often tonal nature of my work, as well as my use of light as an instrument of drawing.

Artist's website

Kamau Patton

Yara Pina

//Untitled 3//, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012 //Untitled 3//, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012 //Untitled 3//, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012

Untitled 3, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012

In my works, charcoal is the primary material. Although drawing is investigated from a traditional material in my process I intend conceptually to maximize the use of charcoal, its properties and forms to insert and inscribe the body actions. In recent works I`ve been exploring new repertories of violence – destruction, torture, vandalism, crimes, iconoclasm, war – in relation to drawing. The actions involve the clash/shock between a body and an object. The charred objects are both weapons and drawing instruments. Other objects – stones and iron pipe – are improvised weapons. They make marks, violence marks, inscriptions of bodily actions and evidences of destructions.

Artist's website

Catya Plate

//Foot Licker// //Foot Licker// //Foot Licker//

Foot Licker

Drawing is an essential part of my artistic practice that includes animated films, sculptures, installations and paintings. Not limited to paper and pencil, I have been exploring embroidery and sewing as a drawing medium by manipulating fabric and other materials with thread and needle.

Artist's website

Ronny Quevedo

Sarada Rauch

//In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos//, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014
//In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos//, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014
//In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos//, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014

In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014

Reinterpretation gives history more than one perspective. With this in mind, I reinterpret traditional narratives using contemporary images. My aim is to create more than one perspective on the narratives we live with today. When thinking about drawing, I think of line. There are many definitions of line and endless uses of the word, the oldest of which is "rope, cord, thread.” Historical narrative has many dispersed dots to connect-its lineage is not a straight line, or even one single line. Thinking of line as a rope or thread, what is the dominant line of historical narrative and where does this line fray?

Artist's website

Susan Robb

//Upper Kingdom//, C-Print, 2013 //Upper Kingdom//, C-Print, 2013 //Upper Kingdom//, C-Print, 2013

Upper Kingdom, C-Print, 2013

I draw lines between people, place, and our search for utopia through sculpture, performance, photography, and lived practice. I use a combination of poetic applications of technology (3D printing, video conferencing, methane digesting), an interrogation and manipulation of materials (rocks, black plastic, cultured crystals), and a re-purposing of forms and sites (bike parking-as-social hub; hiking trail-as-studio space). I ask my viewers to follow the path of my various projects which act as a series of calls and responses, each work framing propositions for future exploration.

Artist's website

Zach Rockhill

Andrew Ross

//Runny Palette//, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013 //Runny Palette//, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013 //Runny Palette//, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013

Runny Palette, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013

My practice is invested in drawings in space and exploring the limits of representation. My work employs an intentional confusion of allegorical narrative and production processes, assemblage and still life. I try to make works that approach a state of being teetering between image and object. I see drawing as a mediator in my practice, which works in tandem with physical constraints to arrive at a balance between the materials and the image comprised.

Artist's website

Lauren Seiden

//Mylar Wrap 4//, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014 //Mylar Wrap 4//, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014 //Mylar Wrap 4//, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014

Mylar Wrap 4, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014

My work explores the essential elements of process and materiality through an intuitive and intimate layering of graphite that tests the conventions of drawing; breaking down the surface and transforming the paper into a physical, textural and structural form. Situating it not as a medium of preparation or provision, but as a final form, often displayed on wooden stretcher bars. This painterly application of graphite further expands upon the notion of drawing as painting and painting as sculpture. Pieces with a metallic, armor-like appearance, also contain moments of breakage (revealing the delicate nature of this medium). The act of folding paper strengthens its structure while weakening the surface, allowing for necessary manipulation of the material in order to maintain stability. These dualities of strength and fragility are encapsulated within a process that, like the work itself, strikes a balance between the internal and external; challenging the idea of control and chance.

Artist's website

Mona Sharma

//Justice Takes a Holiday//, series of digital drawings, 2013 //Justice Takes a Holiday//, series of digital drawings, 2013 //Justice Takes a Holiday//, series of digital drawings, 2013

Justice Takes a Holiday, series of digital drawings, 2013

In both my role as an artist and a medical illustrator in a patient education office, I see drawing as an immediate, economical and versatile medium that is ideal for the transmission of complex and difficult knowledge. Its accessible nature also lends well to subversive acts.

Artist's website

Adam Shecter

//New Year//. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes. //New Year//. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes. //New Year//. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes.

New Year. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes.

Since I work largely in animation, most of my drawing is invisible…or if not invisible, more oriented to a choreography of movement than discrete images or frames. People are sometimes surprised by how "incorrect" or shoddy a seemingly beautiful image from an animation can look when the movement is frozen. When I teach animation, I have to break students of the idea that every picture has to be perfect. Animation depends on drawing at the same time that it rejects some notions of what drawing should be. It is the motion that matters. Though drawing represents a very large part of my practice, it is hard to share outside of my videos.

Artist's website

Lior Shvil

Alfred Steiner

The question about drawing that I've been thinking about the most lately is, Which is more contrived, artificial, inauthentic, etc.: to draw like a child or to draw like an academic?

Artist's website

Naho Taruishi

//Woman in the Dunes//, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014
//Woman in the Dunes//, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014
//Woman in the Dunes//, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014

Woman in the Dunes, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014

the flowing river
never stops,
and yet the water
never stays
the same.

Chomei Kamono, thirteenth century

Artist's website

Jina Valentine

Arturs Virtmanis

//That Writing on That Wall//, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014 //That Writing on That Wall//, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014 //That Writing on That Wall//, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014

That Writing on That Wall, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014

Arturs Virtmanis creates visually and metaphorically dense, provisional drawing environments that combine relics of sentimental imagery of past eras, cryptic texts in a form of obsessive calligraphy, collections of found and drawn objects a la cabinet of curiosities, architectural scale models and residue that's accumulated in the process of creation of works. Charcoal is the material of choice — used obsessively, often to the point of deep and vaporous blackness. Exploring such themes as entropy, melancholy and messianism these "sets" draw upon obscure, sometimes fictional histories of humanities.

Artist's website

Barbara Weissberger

//Collage formation, red and yellow stripes//, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013 //Collage formation, red and yellow stripes//, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013 //Collage formation, red and yellow stripes//, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013

Collage formation, red and yellow stripes, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013

My engagement with drawing centers on the immediacy of mark making, on the mark’s resilience as itself even in representation, and on the transparency of process that often distinguishes drawing from other art forms. The series Collage Formations is highly improvisatory. I photograph studio set-ups of all kinds of things that I find, make and alter –rocks and mirrors, sculptures and cut papers to name a few. Though pictorial illusion is intensified to the point of disorientation, the object or the material (resilient as itself even in representation) is photographed in a straightforward way with no digital manipulation. The photographic image is a representation of a process that evolves over time so traces of the process remain, if attenuated, to the end.

Artist's website