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Eleanor Aldrich

//PINK COUCH//, SILICONE AND ENAMEL ON CANVAS, 11 x 14 INCHES, 2012 //PINK COUCH//, SILICONE AND ENAMEL ON CANVAS, 11 x 14 INCHES, 2012 //PINK COUCH//, SILICONE AND ENAMEL ON CANVAS, 11 x 14 INCHES, 2012

PINK COUCH, SILICONE AND ENAMEL ON CANVAS, 11 x 14 INCHES, 2012

My work is textural and alchemical; I match materials – often industrial sealants – and techniques to the subject matter they look like, thereby approaching verisimilitude without realistic rendering. I work with a kind of mimetic literalism that embodies the subject but serves pictorial conventions as well, posing questions about physicality as the standard of reality. I find that the tension between the frankness of the materials and the deception of illusion complicates the terms of viewership, and allows for a recognition that is deeper than language.

Artist's website

Colleen Asper & Marika Kandelaki

//Dictionary of the Hole: E//, Photo (complete work includes text), 2012 //Dictionary of the Hole: E//, Photo (complete work includes text), 2012 //Dictionary of the Hole: E//, Photo (complete work includes text), 2012

Dictionary of the Hole: E, Photo (complete work includes text), 2012

Hole is an ongoing project between Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki. The collaboration began three years ago in an effort to construct a space in which we are accountable to each other and not merely circulating under the patriarchal law and communicating through the patriarchal symbolic. We choose to work under the name Hole to understand and to undo the categories of lack that describe our position as women. We believe resistance only takes place when the hysteric starts to speak not to the master, but to herselves—to the many in and of herself, melting the boundaries of the body as marked by the structure. There are two parts to Hole: Hole ABC’s and Hole 123’s. Hole 123’s are performances that demonstrate structural positions within the hole, and Hole ABC’s are narrative and are centered around a dictionary of synonyms for the hole, with each entry accompanied by a text and an image.

Artist's website (Colleen Asper)
Artist's website (Marika Kandelaki)

Amadeo Azar

//Iacov chernikov + Raul lozza//, watercolor and bronce leaf on paper 95 x 72 cm each, 2013 //Iacov chernikov + Raul lozza//, watercolor and bronce leaf on paper 95 x 72 cm each, 2013 //Iacov chernikov + Raul lozza//, watercolor and bronce leaf on paper 95 x 72 cm each, 2013

Iacov chernikov + Raul lozza, watercolor and bronce leaf on paper 95 x 72 cm each, 2013

My work pushes drawing techniques to make them collapse and rediscover a new
poetry.

Artist's website

Lauren Bakst

LAUREN BAKST AND EMMA GEISDORF IN //LIVING ROOM INDEX AND POOL//, 2014 LAUREN BAKST AND EMMA GEISDORF IN //LIVING ROOM INDEX AND POOL//, 2014 LAUREN BAKST AND EMMA GEISDORF IN //LIVING ROOM INDEX AND POOL//, 2014

LAUREN BAKST AND EMMA GEISDORF IN LIVING ROOM INDEX AND POOL, 2014

Dancing, like drawing, is an embodied process of inscribing lines in space. As someone who makes performances, I am interested in the movements, impressions, disappearances, and recordings of these lines. My dances often involve a vocabulary of physical actions (getting up & down, knitting, approximating images & difficult positions, lip-syncing…) that are repeated and reconfigured via the capturing and playing back of video and audio, and the fragmentation and subsequent layering of language and movement.

Artist's website

Daniel Barroca

//Stuck in a loop//, 2014, graphite and roller pen on paper, A4
//It's about the way the lines struggle to fit / to touch each other harmoniously / to go into each other in an attempt to make sense together without accomplishing it / and that being a vision of life itself / Of its political sense in relation to its spiritual sense.// //Stuck in a loop//, 2014, graphite and roller pen on paper, A4
//It's about the way the lines struggle to fit / to touch each other harmoniously / to go into each other in an attempt to make sense together without accomplishing it / and that being a vision of life itself / Of its political sense in relation to its spiritual sense.// //Stuck in a loop//, 2014, graphite and roller pen on paper, A4
//It's about the way the lines struggle to fit / to touch each other harmoniously / to go into each other in an attempt to make sense together without accomplishing it / and that being a vision of life itself / Of its political sense in relation to its spiritual sense.//

Stuck in a loop, 2014, graphite and roller pen on paper, A4
It's about the way the lines struggle to fit / to touch each other harmoniously / to go into each other in an attempt to make sense together without accomplishing it / and that being a vision of life itself / Of its political sense in relation to its spiritual sense.

Zoe Beloff

//Two Marxists in Hollywood//, Film still, 2015 //Two Marxists in Hollywood//, Film still, 2015 //Two Marxists in Hollywood//, Film still, 2015

Two Marxists in Hollywood, Film still, 2015

I work with a wide range of media including film, projection performance, installation and drawing. Each project aims to connect the present to past so that it might illuminate the future in new ways. I use drawing in dialogue with moving images. Currently I am focusing on Sergei Eisenstein and Bertolt Brecht in Hollywood and films they might have made.Though speculative films, images, and texts, my work explores both their original ideas and their relevance today.

Artist's website

Jimbo Blachly

//notebook page 1// //notebook page 1// //notebook page 1//

notebook page 1

Drawing is central to my process of working through ideas. For the past few years the majority of my drawings have been made in small notebooks, often executed while I am out and about, on the train, or made while walking in one of the city’s parks. Initially these notebooks started out as ideas for making paintings but have since grown into something like a visual compendium of forms or tones abstracted from daily experience that exist independently from the idea of preparatory drawings leading to a particular painting or sculpture.



Artist's website

Becky Brown

//Sestina 1// (detail), 2012, Mixed media on paper, 62 x 175 inches //Sestina 1// (detail), 2012, Mixed media on paper, 62 x 175 inches //Sestina 1// (detail), 2012, Mixed media on paper, 62 x 175 inches

Sestina 1 (detail), 2012, Mixed media on paper, 62 x 175 inches

I use drawing at various levels of a total practice that includes painting, sculpture, collage, installation and drawings themselves. My work focuses on visual vs. text language, the distinct conventions of each as modes of communication, and the overlaps that inevitably occur between them. I explore the relationship of this composite language to architecture, urban space and the tradition of abstraction. My current “Complexes” series of long, scroll-like drawings, adapts pre-modern poetic forms to today’s hybrid information-flow. The “Spill” series includes site-specific installations and discrete sculptures: interior spaces, architectural features and household objects become vessels for an unlikely, overflowing collection of stuff. I believe drawing - as practice and product - can serve as a (missing) link between a wide range of artistic disciplines, within an individual practice or for a diverse group of artists.

Artist's website

Matt Bua

Matt Bua makes small scale improvised buildings, hand-built people's museums and roadside attractions. His recent work takes form in fantastical spaces that redefine and re-imagine found objects and sustainable resources as functional elements in architecture. Bua's present project is the collaborative construction of small scale examples of vernacular, experimental, and visionary architecture on a piece of land in Catskill, NY which also contains lithic remains from an ancient culture. Bua has shown work internationally at exhibitions and public spaces including Mass MoCA, PS1/MoMA, Brooklyn Museum, Lake Coniston in the UK, and on Roosevelt and Governor's Island. The book "Architectural Inventions: Visionary Drawings" which grew out of the on-line active archive was edited in collaboration with Maximillian Goldfarb and published by Laurence King in 2012.



Artist's website (Matt Bua)

Ernesto Caivano

Maurice Carlin

//Endless Pageless//, 2014, CMYK inks, blank advertising card in sizes A0 to A10, tape, monitors //Endless Pageless//, 2014, CMYK inks, blank advertising card in sizes A0 to A10, tape, monitors //Endless Pageless//, 2014, CMYK inks, blank advertising card in sizes A0 to A10, tape, monitors

Endless Pageless, 2014, CMYK inks, blank advertising card in sizes A0 to A10, tape, monitors

Maurice Carlin is a Manchester based artist. His work merges performance, place and publishing to produce dialogues between digital and physical experience. Works are produced in collections, often in conjunction with others who act as co-contributors to the process or joint custodians of the resulting work. For Open Sessions, Maurice has initiated a monthly online group-studio session using 'google hangouts' to explore the video conferencing platform as a shared canvas, for discussions around studio practice and to trial collective drawing-related exercises.

Artist's website

Lea Cetera

//Observational Comedy//, install view, 2014 //Observational Comedy//, install view, 2014 //Observational Comedy//, install view, 2014

Observational Comedy, install view, 2014

My work is concerned with the mediation of technology and the alienation of the human body in contemporary culture. Through recent installations that include filmed performances, where projections of the “ghosted” human body washes over sculptural elements, I attempt to create an alienating/disorienting illusory effect that reflects our ever-increasing loss of the corporeal gesture in the every day, and the entrapment of the human psyche within technology; manipulating and playing with memory, space and time.

Artist's website

Youmna Chlala

//LANGUE//, WOOD, ALUMINUM, AND ROPE, 2013 //LANGUE//, WOOD, ALUMINUM, AND ROPE, 2013 //LANGUE//, WOOD, ALUMINUM, AND ROPE, 2013

LANGUE, WOOD, ALUMINUM, AND ROPE, 2013

My work is an investigation of architecture and fate. It is often situated in places or
bodies that translate themselves against or through an external world that is
constantly trying to name them. This occurs through play and experiments with the
movement between intimacy and monumentality. Drawing functions as translation,
an in-betweeness that allows for things to occur or connections to be made that
never seemed possible. Drawing is a way for me to explore the unexpected,
peripheral, ecstatic aspects of improbability as it remains activated through the
body, much like walking activates a city.

Artist's website

CHOKRA

CHOKRA performs //Zawaj Al Khaleej (Gulf Marriage)// at Queer New York International Arts Festival, Abrons Arts Center, New York on October 24, 2013. © CHOKRA, 2014 CHOKRA performs //Zawaj Al Khaleej (Gulf Marriage)// at Queer New York International Arts Festival, Abrons Arts Center, New York on October 24, 2013. © CHOKRA, 2014 CHOKRA performs //Zawaj Al Khaleej (Gulf Marriage)// at Queer New York International Arts Festival, Abrons Arts Center, New York on October 24, 2013. © CHOKRA, 2014

CHOKRA performs Zawaj Al Khaleej (Gulf Marriage) at Queer New York International Arts Festival, Abrons Arts Center, New York on October 24, 2013. © CHOKRA, 2014

My approach to drawing seeks to locate the medium in performance with multi-sensory and electronic compositions. Featuring music, algorithmic film, generative light, dance, multi-lingual script, scent, vivid powders, ceremonial practices and gender-bending posturing, the practice of drawing is infused with an all-inviting queer spirit, full of joy, optimism and celebration. I am interested in updating and rendering drawing in an ever-evolving potential of multimedia possibilities that invite formalisms for the future. CHOKRA's work has been seen at MoMA, PS1, The Watermill Center, Drawing Center, New Museum, KUMU Museum, Kunstmuseum, Saatchi Gallery, Centre Pompidou, Casoria Contemporary Art Museum, Scope Art Miami & Basel and numerous prestigious venues.

Artist's website

Onyedika Chuke

Onyedika Chuke was born in Oneisha, Nigeria. He studied at Cooper Union and currently resides in New York City. With a focus on sculpture and text, the artist imagines his most recent work as a sculptural archive called The Forever Museum Archive, which he began in Libya in 2011. Chuke assumes the role of the archivist, researcher, and conservator; all working together within the constructs of a theoretical museum. The mission of this museum is to collect and re-contextualize historical objects as the artist reflects on contemporary theories in politics, culture, and architecture. Since 2011, he has worked on the archive in New York, Switzerland, France, and Rome.


Artist's website

Annette Cords

//Orphan//, Hand-woven Jacquard tapestry, cotton 40” x 43”, 2012 //Orphan//, Hand-woven Jacquard tapestry, cotton 40” x 43”, 2012 //Orphan//, Hand-woven Jacquard tapestry, cotton 40” x 43”, 2012

Orphan, Hand-woven Jacquard tapestry, cotton 40” x 43”, 2012

Certain themes persist in my work: the potential of mark-making, writing as drawing, language systems and vernacular styles, and how we process and interpret visual information, all of which are connected to drawing as a discipline. Jacquard weaving is at once simple and complex. The language used to set up weave structures is straightforward and binary: the warp is either up or down. With the Jacquard loom, however, each warp thread moves independently, allowing for almost infinite possibilities of mark-making. This ability to create marks, along with the linear qualities of the warp and weft, the intricacy of the interlaced yarns and the incremental process used in the construction make weaving a drawing medium for me.

Artist's website

Marlon de Azambuja

Kerry Downey

//Territories//, graphite on paper, 18 x 24", 2013; Series of six rubbingsmade from drawing with hot glue
//Territories//, graphite on paper, 18 x 24", 2013; Series of six rubbingsmade from drawing with hot glue
//Territories//, graphite on paper, 18 x 24", 2013; Series of six rubbingsmade from drawing with hot glue

Territories, graphite on paper, 18 x 24", 2013; Series of six rubbingsmade from drawing with hot glue

I’m interested in how a line or mark relates back to the body as an index of experiences: ruptures, sensations, needs and desires. Embodiment is always an “in-relation-to” phenomenon; we are forever entangled in our environment. Mark-making is personal, formal, and conceptual— lines functioning as possibilities for connection, as potential ways of being, as a mapping of the correspondences between private emotion and political consciousness. Edges, boundaries, outlines, areas and shapes are never static. Forms shift, demanding multiple reads, as if the act of looking is also a list of potentialities. By expanding and multiplying modes of recognition (seeing, marking, touching, listening), we make way for new kinds of understanding, bodies and relationships. With this there is a belief that alternative forms of support can open up, like learning how to see negative space for the first time ever. Figure is to ground as body is not only to site, but also to support.

Artist's website

Derek Dunlop

//Fear of Invisibility (Erased oval on the back of Annie’s Drawings)//, 1915, 2014. 14 1/8 x 30 1/4 Inches. //Fear of Invisibility (Erased oval on the back of Annie’s Drawings)//, 1915, 2014. 14 1/8 x 30 1/4 Inches. //Fear of Invisibility (Erased oval on the back of Annie’s Drawings)//, 1915, 2014. 14 1/8 x 30 1/4 Inches.

Fear of Invisibility (Erased oval on the back of Annie’s Drawings), 1915, 2014. 14 1/8 x 30 1/4 Inches.

My work engages with the tradition of abstraction developed in the last half of the twentieth century. By recalling key formal strategies, my practice queers the terms of representation typical of the contemporary discourse surrounding painting and drawing. I consider process, gesture, and affect - all essential components of drawing - to be important concepts for negotiating and reflecting upon the ethics of representation.

Artist's website

Nicolas Dumit Estevez & Laia Sole

Nicolás Dumit Estévez and Laia Solé, e-, 2015, Performance

Nicolás Dumit Estévez and Laia Solé worked to chroma key the Drawing Center’s lobby with a vast array of green materials, allowing pre-recorded footage of activities in the streets of SOHO and Chinatown to flood the exhibition space. In e-, drawing and erasing become part of a concomitant process that incorporates two actions usually perceived as opposite to one another.



Laia Sole's Website


Nicolas Dumit Estevaz's Website

Joey Fauerso

//Stage theories//, (stil), single channel video, 5:34, 2013  //Stage theories//, (stil), single channel video, 5:34, 2013  //Stage theories//, (stil), single channel video, 5:34, 2013

Stage theories, (stil), single channel video, 5:34, 2013

My work involves drawing in many different capacities. I make a lot of drawing and paintings on paper, and then often times use those drawings for videos and animations. I love the transparency of drawing, the way it reveals its own making. I am also interested in the performative aspects of drawing-the ways that gesture and movement can manifest through marks and action.

Artist's website

Maximilian Goldfarb

Maximilian Goldfarb's projects take many forms, often including drawing and publication formats as a way of incorporating visual research process and other ephemera as a multiple, distributive aspect of works. In the context of Open Sessions, Goldfarb developed ‘Handbook for Human Machines’, an image book and operating manual for drawing, sculpture and radio transmission; examinations of the mutable architecture of human/machine anatomies.



Artist's website
Handbook for Human Machines

Heather Hart

Tatiana Istomina

//Scary Stories//, digital drawings and video stills, participatory installation video project, 2014.This participatory projects initiated in collaboration with another Open Session artist, Joey Fauerso, explores the intersection of drawing and storytelling by inviting the public to share personal stories and create drawings in response to other persons’ tales. The conversations start with the prompt “scary story” and gradually move into the discussion of the more troubling elements in today’s social and political situation. //Scary Stories//, digital drawings and video stills, participatory installation video project, 2014.This participatory projects initiated in collaboration with another Open Session artist, Joey Fauerso, explores the intersection of drawing and storytelling by inviting the public to share personal stories and create drawings in response to other persons’ tales. The conversations start with the prompt “scary story” and gradually move into the discussion of the more troubling elements in today’s social and political situation. //Scary Stories//, digital drawings and video stills, participatory installation video project, 2014.This participatory projects initiated in collaboration with another Open Session artist, Joey Fauerso, explores the intersection of drawing and storytelling by inviting the public to share personal stories and create drawings in response to other persons’ tales. The conversations start with the prompt “scary story” and gradually move into the discussion of the more troubling elements in today’s social and political situation.

Scary Stories, digital drawings and video stills, participatory installation video project, 2014.This participatory projects initiated in collaboration with another Open Session artist, Joey Fauerso, explores the intersection of drawing and storytelling by inviting the public to share personal stories and create drawings in response to other persons’ tales. The conversations start with the prompt “scary story” and gradually move into the discussion of the more troubling elements in today’s social and political situation.

I like to think of drawing in the broadest sense – not only as an image made with pencils, ink, chalk, etc., or the act of creating such images – but as a variety of actions that may be described by the word draw. These include choose (as in “draw a winning ticket”), infer from evidence (as in “draw a conclusion”), provoke (as in “draw enemy fire”), and depending on context, attract, inhale, accumulate, or extract the essence from. This is why, even though my art projects use a variety of mediums – painting, video, film, and installation – I think of them as different kinds of drawing.

Artist's website

Steffani Jemison

Brad Killam

landscape (birch), film still, super 8 mm film, 4:19 minutes, 2014 landscape (birch), film still, super 8 mm film, 4:19 minutes, 2014 landscape (birch), film still, super 8 mm film, 4:19 minutes, 2014

landscape (birch), film still, super 8 mm film, 4:19 minutes, 2014

These craftsmen did not relax their thoughtful self-discipline even with respect to features of their work that would ordinarily not be visible. Although no one would notice if those features were not quite right, the craftsmen would be bothered by their consciences. So nothing was swept under the rug. Or, one might perhaps also say, there was no bullshit. - Harry G. Frankfurt, On Bullshit

Alexandra Lerman

//Rabbit//, Immediate release, Sumi ink on paper, set of 26 drawings, 19" x 13"' //Rabbit//, Immediate release, Sumi ink on paper, set of 26 drawings, 19" x 13"' //Rabbit//, Immediate release, Sumi ink on paper, set of 26 drawings, 19" x 13"'

Rabbit, Immediate release, Sumi ink on paper, set of 26 drawings, 19" x 13"'

Alexandra Lerman looks at the archaic in order to understand the technological progress of today. Drawing is the most basic human form of communication; making marks, recording ideas and thinking visually. Lerman’s “Release” series of unfired terracotta tablets inscribed with touchscreen gestures make a connection to cuneiform - the first form of writing, likening the notation system developed to keep track of bureaucratic records of early Sumerian civilization to the “intuitive” gestures invented by the interface engineers to communicate with contemporary technology. Similarly, a series of 26 sumi ink gesture drawings “Immediate Release” each depicting a different pose from Bikram Choudhury Yoga Inc. share the sheet of paper with Apple’s patents for touch screen gestures.

Artist's website

Daniel Lichtman

//We Have A Dome//, video installation at The Tetley, Leeds, 2014 //We Have A Dome//, video installation at The Tetley, Leeds, 2014 //We Have A Dome//, video installation at The Tetley, Leeds, 2014

We Have A Dome, video installation at The Tetley, Leeds, 2014

Daniel Lichtman is drawn to the autodidact, or self-taught thinker and speaker. The character who confidently and charismatically develops his own, self-sufficient explanation of lived experience as a whole, enfolding the breadth of personal, political, geological and spiritual experience into a finite set of patterns and formulae. In his performance and video work, Lichtman appropriates and ventriloquizes this character, sketching out a tender but hesitant set of relations between knowledge, belief and irony.

Artist's website

Patte Loper

//Study #3 For After Lebbeus: A Model For Drawing//, digital mock up, 2014 //Study #3 For After Lebbeus: A Model For Drawing//, digital mock up, 2014 //Study #3 For After Lebbeus: A Model For Drawing//, digital mock up, 2014

Study #3 For After Lebbeus: A Model For Drawing, digital mock up, 2014

My project for Open Sessions is made from recycled material (cardboard, wood, paint) and uses the unique architecture of the Lab Space and the recent Drawing Center exhibition of Lebbeus Woods as departure points. Inverting the paper architect's approach of visualizing built structure through drawing only, I build intuitively, without a plan, all the while considering how built form is coded with an ethical dimension - a concern in Woods' design. Once installed, I will be drawing the built form from observation at set times during the exhibition, leaving the drawings behind on a preset shelf built into the structure for that purpose. By drawing through observation, I am intentionally referring to historical periods before the use of photography, asserting the continued relevance of drawing to depict and understand phenomena that would otherwise remain unknown.

Artist's website

Yuri Masnyj

Harold Mendez

//I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka)//, Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014 //I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka)//, Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014 //I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka)//, Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014

I’m not always fitting (After Koudelka), Mixed-media on reclaimed glass, bricks, soot, 43” x 70”, 2014

Nyeema Morgan

//"obviously God"//, Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012 //"obviously God"//, Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012 //"obviously God"//, Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012

"obviously God", Unfired clay, metal brackets mounted on wall, 2012

I develop my art practice within an interdisciplinary framework that explores the personal and cultural economy of knowledge through familiar artifacts. My works, which have included large-scale drawings, installations, sculpture and printed matter, are inspired by philosophical conflicts that arise in our everyday encounters with images, objects and information. Through these works I attempt call into question information’s conceptual and hierarchical value, challenge the boundaries of authoritative reasoning as well as make evident my own implications within a larger socio-political drama.

Artist's website

Laura Morrison

//Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters//, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014 //Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters//, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014 //Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters//, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014

Vivian Kwebana of Shark Spotters, Cape Town, Made To Recline - Plasticine relief, embedded ink, 12 x 8 ft, 2014

Laura Morrison is interested in instances of vulnerability and accountability. She draws anecdotes from her personal and professional life and other fictions for elaboration in both writing and material gesture. Her recent work in texts, quick watercolours and large, plasticine reliefs propose awkwardly layered clichés and binaries: big and small – dumb and clever – soft and rigid - visible or discrete - hateful and caring. Morrison considers drawing to be inherent to the tangible gestures in her work and the way she paces a text, but equally in relation to a political notion of line, lineage, generationality, social and power relations and how those threads are explicitly drawn through her work.

Artist's website

Marcelo Moscheta

//POULIGUEN//, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011 //POULIGUEN//, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011 //POULIGUEN//, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011

POULIGUEN, graphite on PVC board, iron, wood and stones, 250 x 250 x 70 cm. 2011

Displacement, Territory, Landscape and Location are my main interests.
I have made installations, drawings and photographs born from my time in remote locations.
Through uncommon materials and techniques my works addresses the notion of ephemerality and mankind's efforts to understand and recreate physical and geographical aspects found in natural environments.

Artist's website

Matt Neff

//Lambent//, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014 
//Lambent//, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014 
//Lambent//, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014

Lambent, Glass, Plexiglas, Mylar, tape, graphite, marker, fluorescent light, 40” x 48", 2014

More than the application of a specific medium or hand to a surface, I have come to think about drawing as a way of seeing. I began my career as an artist in traditional and architectural drawing, and it has been my facility with this medium that has allowed me to experiment with different drawing strategies, and ultimately, different mediums and disciplines. As my work has continued to develop and expand, drawing has, in many ways, remained the framework for how I approach materials. When I make sculptures, photographs, or prints, they are embedded with an underlying matrix or scaffolding in their form. This broad conceptualization of drawing is also reflected in the often tonal nature of my work, as well as my use of light as an instrument of drawing.

Artist's website

Kamau Patton

Yara Pina

//Untitled 3//, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012 //Untitled 3//, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012 //Untitled 3//, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012

Untitled 3, charred chairs thrown against the wall, 2012

In my works, charcoal is the primary material. Although drawing is investigated from a traditional material in my process I intend conceptually to maximize the use of charcoal, its properties and forms to insert and inscribe the body actions. In recent works I`ve been exploring new repertories of violence – destruction, torture, vandalism, crimes, iconoclasm, war – in relation to drawing. The actions involve the clash/shock between a body and an object. The charred objects are both weapons and drawing instruments. Other objects – stones and iron pipe – are improvised weapons. They make marks, violence marks, inscriptions of bodily actions and evidences of destructions.

Artist's website

Catya Plate

//Foot Licker// //Foot Licker// //Foot Licker//

Foot Licker

Drawing is an essential part of my artistic practice that includes animated films, sculptures, installations and paintings. Not limited to paper and pencil, I have been exploring embroidery and sewing as a drawing medium by manipulating fabric and other materials with thread and needle.

Artist's website

Ronny Quevedo

Sarada Rauch

//In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos//, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014
//In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos//, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014
//In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos//, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014

In doing so, you become the monster you are trying to combat: Uranus and Cronos, 9 x 6", c-print, 2014

Reinterpretation gives history more than one perspective. With this in mind, I reinterpret traditional narratives using contemporary images. My aim is to create more than one perspective on the narratives we live with today. When thinking about drawing, I think of line. There are many definitions of line and endless uses of the word, the oldest of which is "rope, cord, thread.” Historical narrative has many dispersed dots to connect-its lineage is not a straight line, or even one single line. Thinking of line as a rope or thread, what is the dominant line of historical narrative and where does this line fray?

Artist's website

Susan Robb

//Upper Kingdom//, C-Print, 2013 //Upper Kingdom//, C-Print, 2013 //Upper Kingdom//, C-Print, 2013

Upper Kingdom, C-Print, 2013

I draw lines between people, place, and our search for utopia through sculpture, performance, photography, and lived practice. I use a combination of poetic applications of technology (3D printing, video conferencing, methane digesting), an interrogation and manipulation of materials (rocks, black plastic, cultured crystals), and a re-purposing of forms and sites (bike parking-as-social hub; hiking trail-as-studio space). I ask my viewers to follow the path of my various projects which act as a series of calls and responses, each work framing propositions for future exploration.

Artist's website

Zach Rockhill

Andrew Ross

//Runny Palette//, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013 //Runny Palette//, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013 //Runny Palette//, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013

Runny Palette, archival inkjet print in artist’s frame, 20" x 30", 2013

My practice is invested in drawings in space and exploring the limits of representation. My work employs an intentional confusion of allegorical narrative and production processes, assemblage and still life. I try to make works that approach a state of being teetering between image and object. I see drawing as a mediator in my practice, which works in tandem with physical constraints to arrive at a balance between the materials and the image comprised.

Artist's website

Lauren Seiden

//Mylar Wrap 4//, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014 //Mylar Wrap 4//, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014 //Mylar Wrap 4//, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014

Mylar Wrap 4, graphite on mylar, 19 × 17 × 4 inches, 2014

My work explores the essential elements of process and materiality through an intuitive and intimate layering of graphite that tests the conventions of drawing; breaking down the surface and transforming the paper into a physical, textural and structural form. Situating it not as a medium of preparation or provision, but as a final form, often displayed on wooden stretcher bars. This painterly application of graphite further expands upon the notion of drawing as painting and painting as sculpture. Pieces with a metallic, armor-like appearance, also contain moments of breakage (revealing the delicate nature of this medium). The act of folding paper strengthens its structure while weakening the surface, allowing for necessary manipulation of the material in order to maintain stability. These dualities of strength and fragility are encapsulated within a process that, like the work itself, strikes a balance between the internal and external; challenging the idea of control and chance.

Artist's website

Mona Sharma

//Justice Takes a Holiday//, series of digital drawings, 2013 //Justice Takes a Holiday//, series of digital drawings, 2013 //Justice Takes a Holiday//, series of digital drawings, 2013

Justice Takes a Holiday, series of digital drawings, 2013

In both my role as an artist and a medical illustrator in a patient education office, I see drawing as an immediate, economical and versatile medium that is ideal for the transmission of complex and difficult knowledge. Its accessible nature also lends well to subversive acts.

Artist's website

Adam Shecter

//New Year//. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes. //New Year//. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes. //New Year//. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes.

New Year. Installation Shot. Single channel Digital Video and Animation. 26
minutes.

Since I work largely in animation, most of my drawing is invisible…or if not invisible, more oriented to a choreography of movement than discrete images or frames. People are sometimes surprised by how "incorrect" or shoddy a seemingly beautiful image from an animation can look when the movement is frozen. When I teach animation, I have to break students of the idea that every picture has to be perfect. Animation depends on drawing at the same time that it rejects some notions of what drawing should be. It is the motion that matters. Though drawing represents a very large part of my practice, it is hard to share outside of my videos.

Artist's website

Lior Shvil

Alfred Steiner

The question about drawing that I've been thinking about the most lately is, Which is more contrived, artificial, inauthentic, etc.: to draw like a child or to draw like an academic?

Artist's website

Naho Taruishi

//Woman in the Dunes//, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014
//Woman in the Dunes//, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014
//Woman in the Dunes//, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014

Woman in the Dunes, graphite and charcoal on Magnani paper 13 1/2” x 9”, 2014

the flowing river
never stops,
and yet the water
never stays
the same.

Chomei Kamono, thirteenth century

Artist's website

Jina Valentine

Arturs Virtmanis

//That Writing on That Wall//, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014 //That Writing on That Wall//, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014 //That Writing on That Wall//, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014

That Writing on That Wall, approximately 30' x 8' x 6', charcoal on painted concrete wall, charcoal powder, 2014

Arturs Virtmanis creates visually and metaphorically dense, provisional drawing environments that combine relics of sentimental imagery of past eras, cryptic texts in a form of obsessive calligraphy, collections of found and drawn objects a la cabinet of curiosities, architectural scale models and residue that's accumulated in the process of creation of works. Charcoal is the material of choice — used obsessively, often to the point of deep and vaporous blackness. Exploring such themes as entropy, melancholy and messianism these "sets" draw upon obscure, sometimes fictional histories of humanities.

Artist's website

Barbara Weissberger

//Collage formation, red and yellow stripes//, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013 //Collage formation, red and yellow stripes//, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013 //Collage formation, red and yellow stripes//, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013

Collage formation, red and yellow stripes, 48” x 32”, digital pigment print, 2013

My engagement with drawing centers on the immediacy of mark making, on the mark’s resilience as itself even in representation, and on the transparency of process that often distinguishes drawing from other art forms. The series Collage Formations is highly improvisatory. I photograph studio set-ups of all kinds of things that I find, make and alter –rocks and mirrors, sculptures and cut papers to name a few. Though pictorial illusion is intensified to the point of disorientation, the object or the material (resilient as itself even in representation) is photographed in a straightforward way with no digital manipulation. The photographic image is a representation of a process that evolves over time so traces of the process remain, if attenuated, to the end.

Artist's website