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Main Gallery Oct 13, 2017 - Feb 04, 2018

Judith Bernstein

Cabinet of Horrors

Judith Bernstein, //Trump Genie//, 2016. Acrylic on paper, 29 x 41 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Judith Bernstein, //Trump Genie//, 2016. Acrylic on paper, 29 x 41 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Judith Bernstein, //Trump Genie//, 2016. Acrylic on paper, 29 x 41 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Judith Bernstein, Trump Genie, 2016. Acrylic on paper, 29 x 41 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Judith Bernstein: Cabinet of Horrors presents a new body of work by the artist, specifically commissioned by The Drawing Center. Focusing on works on paper made since Donald J. Trump was elected president in November 2016, this exhibition includes eighteen new drawings, four large-scale paper panel murals, a series of drawn “dollar bills,” and vintage piggy banks in vitrines. A series of free political campaign pins designed by Bernstein are available at the museum entrance.


Bernstein began engaging with social issues in her work during the 1960s, creating anti-Vietnam drawings, monumental phalluses, and pieces consisting entirely of her own signature. The present series of drawings use Trump’s own insult-driven, childlike syntax and language to distill Bernstein’s anger, disgust, and disapproval of the current administration and its policies. Through her new series of drawings, Bernstein transforms her critique into powerful graphic and text-based works. Providing context for Bernstein’s recent work, this exhibition opens with one of the artist’s earliest political drawings from 1969, as well as, a selection of five “Word Drawings” from 1995, including: Liberty, Justice, Equality, Evil, and Fear.


Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Judith Bernstein: Cabinet of Horrors is made possible through the support of Valeria Napoleone XX, and Corina Larkin and Nigel Dawn, with additional contributions from Burger Collection, Hong Kong; Karma International, Zürich/Los Angeles; and an anonymous donor.


Special thanks to Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, for their support of the exhibition catalogue.


Funding of all public programs associated with this exhibition is provided by Valeria Napoleone XX.


Image: Judith Bernstein, Trump Genie, 2016. Acrylic on paper, 29 x 41 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Drawing Room Oct 13, 2017 - Feb 04, 2018

Eddie Martinez

Studio Wall

Eddie Martinez, //Untitled//, 2015. Silkscreen ink, oil paint, spray paint and enamel on canvas, 
72 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Eddie Martinez, //Untitled//, 2015. Silkscreen ink, oil paint, spray paint and enamel on canvas, 
72 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Eddie Martinez, //Untitled//, 2015. Silkscreen ink, oil paint, spray paint and enamel on canvas, 
72 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Eddie Martinez, Untitled, 2015. Silkscreen ink, oil paint, spray paint and enamel on canvas,
72 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist.


Eddie Martinez’s drawing practice blends seamlessly with his daily life as the New York-based artist carries pen and paper with him on the subway, to the doctor’s office, and to restaurants and lectures, among other work and leisure events. Stylistically evocative of mid-century abstraction, Martinez’s drawings bring their own complexity, plugging a rotating cast of characters into raw, vigorously-drawn landscapes: cartoon ducks, oversized eyes, coiled snakes, and anthropomorphic blocks of color are among his itinerant motifs. In his Brooklyn studio, Martinez maintains a “drawing wall,” wherein sketches ranging in size, shape, and material serve simultaneously as a source of inspiration and a data bank for the artist’s incessant imaginative output. The Drawing Center’s forthcoming exhibition Eddie Martinez: Studio Wall, will bring the drawing wall to the museum. The artist will paper the gallery with thousands of sketches that he will change throughout the exhibition’s run. In addition, several large drawings and paintings will be hung on top of these sketches allowing viewers to observe the interconnection between all aspects of Martinez’s practice.

Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator.

Eddie Martinez: Studio Wall is made possible by the support of Beth DeWoody, Jeannie and T Grant, Barbara Toll, Bruce and Robbi Toll, and Craig Nerenberg.

Special thanks to Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, and Timothy Taylor Gallery, London.

Image: Eddie Martinez, Untitled, 2015. Silkscreen ink, oil paint, spray paint and enamel on canvas, 72 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, and Timothy Taylor Gallery, London.

The Lab Oct 13, 2017 - Nov 19, 2017

What the Body Can Do

Open Sessions 11

Slinko, //Economy of Means//, 2017, archival print, 44 x 68 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Slinko, //Economy of Means//, 2017, archival print, 44 x 68 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Slinko, //Economy of Means//, 2017, archival print, 44 x 68 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Slinko, Economy of Means, 2017, archival print, 44 x 68 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

What the Body Can Do: Open Sessions 11, the final exhibition of the program’s 2016–17 cycle, captures the movement and potential of individual bodies in collective action. The artists in this exhibition dissect spectacles of war, memorialize immigrant and refugee narratives, savor protest cinema and images produced by the paparazzi. The exhibition features artists, Danielle Dean, Olalekan Jeyifous, Jennifer May Reiland, Nataliya Slinko, and Hồng-An Trương. Dean’s animations unravel speech; Jeyifous’ images collapse surrealist aesthetics and the design troupe of architectural folly; telephone screens, mirrors, and the camera’s eye are a window into Reiland’s versions of biblical and mythological tales; bread figures embody uprising and rebellion in Slinko’s large storyboard drawings; and Trương’s photos compose an archive of fragmented views of the Asian American activist movement in the United States.


Open Sessions is a hybrid exhibition/residency program created by Lisa Sigal and Nova Benway, Open Sessions Curators. It provides unique opportunities for selected artists to find new approaches for contextualizing and exhibiting their work through exhibitions, public programs, workshops, and working dinners. The artists selected for Open Sessions may or may not draw as their primary means of art-making. The two-year program engages musicians, architects, dancers, poets—anyone who is interested in expanding the boundaries of drawing. Open Sessions artists work together to create a dynamic, continuous conversation, viewing drawing as an activity rather than a product.

Image: Slinko, Economy of Means, (detail), 2017, archival print, 44 x 68 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Lab Corridor Oct 13, 2017 - Oct 18, 2018

Susan York

Foundation

Susan York, //Untitled – Beam//, 2016. Solid graphite polished, 4 5/8 x 3 x 7 5/8 inches. Susan York, //Untitled – Beam//, 2016. Solid graphite polished, 4 5/8 x 3 x 7 5/8 inches. Susan York, //Untitled – Beam//, 2016. Solid graphite polished, 4 5/8 x 3 x 7 5/8 inches.

Susan York, Untitled – Beam, 2016. Solid graphite polished, 4 5/8 x 3 x 7 5/8 inches.

For the second long-term installation presented in The Drawing Center’s Lab Corridor, Santa Fe-based artist Susan York will create a site-specific installation that references the internal structure of the museum’s 35 Wooster Street building. Using graphite as a sculptural rather than a two-dimensional medium, York will create replicas of parts of the museum’s foundation: eroded concrete piers that protrude above the museum’s ground floor. York’s long-term installation will initiate an expanded field of activity at The Drawing Center, pointing to new opportunities for exploring drawing as an interactive and socially-minded practice. Additionally, by bringing attention to The Drawing Center’s building, York’s installation will generate opportunities for discussion about the importance of museums continuing as public spaces with permanent, physical presence.

Organized by Amber Harper, Assistant Curator.

Susan York: Foundation is made possible by the support of Andrew Wallerstein and Mary Sloane, Diane Karp, Ph.D., James Kelly, and anonymous.

Special thanks to Exhibitions 2d – Marfa.


Image: Susan York, Untitled – Beam, 2016. Solid graphite polished, 4 5/8 x 3 x 7 5/8 inches.

The Lab Dec 01, 2017 - Feb 04, 2018

Raha Raissnia

Alluvius

Raha Raissnia, //Alluvius 12//, 2016. Mixed media, 12 3/8 x 19 3/4 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York. Raha Raissnia, //Alluvius 12//, 2016. Mixed media, 12 3/8 x 19 3/4 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York. Raha Raissnia, //Alluvius 12//, 2016. Mixed media, 12 3/8 x 19 3/4 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York.

Raha Raissnia, Alluvius 12, 2016. Mixed media, 12 3/8 x 19 3/4 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York.

Anticipating an audience whose reading of drawing is informed by new media, Iranian-born artist Raha Raissnia sources her densely-composed charcoal works from her films, each a document of the artist's private life. Using drawing to recreate (and at times undo) moments from everyday life, Raissnia transfers images of friends, strangers, and intimate spaces between celluloid and paper until the original forms become unrecognizable. For her exhibition at The Drawing Center, Raissnia will create a series of film performances, in which photographs of drawings and 35mm film loops are constructed in a flickering, hybrid sequence before the audience. Raissnia will also present several series of works on paper, the belabored surface of each drawing stressing the immense psychological effort that goes into forming each image.

Organized by Amber Harper, Assistant Curator

Image: Raha Raissnia, Alluvius 12, 2016. Mixed media, 12 3/8 x 19 3/4 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York.

Stairwell Feb 21, 2018

Inka Essenhigh

Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016. Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016. Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016.

Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016.


As part of its ongoing series of commissions for the Stairwell, The Drawing Center has asked New York artist Inka Essenhigh to create a site-specific wall drawing. Essenhigh’s installation will be the third in the series, following Gary Simmons’s Ghost Reels (2016–18) and Abdelkader Benchamma’s Dark Matter (2015–16).

An artist with appetites ranging from Hokusai to Surrealism and Byzantine icons to graphic novels, Inka Essenhigh is known for her hallucinatory scenes that weave together the drama of everyday life with quasi-menacing, sci-fi themes. For her installation at The Drawing Center, Essenhigh will create a large-scale drawing of a meandering skyline, a reference to the museum’s downtown space. Essenhigh’s otherworldly installation will lead viewers through a warped SoHo, replete with phantom hallways and Escher-like staircases.

Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Image: Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center (detail), 2016.

Main Gallery Feb 24, 2018 - Mar 09, 2018

Winter Term

Torkwase Dyson and the Wynters-Well Drawing School for Enviornmental Justice

Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017. Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017. Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017.

Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017.

The Drawing Center is pleased to announce Winter Term, a new annual initiative in which the museum will partner with an artist or organization whose mission it is to explore the transformative role that drawing can play in civic and global society. The yearly program, which will consist of public events, classes, and performances as well as an exhibition, will build a community of people to investigate the efficacy of drawing as a tool for addressing inequity and encouraging social change. In a world ever more in need of human connection and compassion, Winter Term will ask how drawing, the most universal medium, might extend beyond the gallery space to provide concrete tools for collective engagement and collaboration. In this way, Winter Term provides a new model for exhibition making as well as for the role that art institutions can play in the real world.


For the first session, which will take place in February and March of 2018, The Drawing Center has invited New York-based artist Torkwase Dyson to create an installation and organize a two-week series of classes, discussions, and formal experiments developed from her incipient project the Wynter-Wells Drawing School for Environmental Justice—named for Jamaican writer Sylvia Wynter and American Civil Rights leader Ida B. Wells. The School will present an experimental curriculum employing techniques culled from the visual arts as well as design theories of geography, infrastructure, engineering, and architecture to initiate dialogue about geographic genealogy in an era of global crisis due to human-induced climate change. Participation in the course will be by application with portions open to the public.


During an open studio-style installation, Dyson will explicate her own formal concept of “Black Compositional Thought” while terms such as improvisation, nomadicity, and re-orientation will be applied to techniques within abstract drawing that confront issues of environmental justice and the path towards a more equitable future. Confirmed invited guests include architect Mabel Wilson, curator Rujeko Hockley, artist and designer Ekene Ijeoma, designer and educator Ronald Morrison, choreographer Dean Moss, and artist Zachery Fabri who will engage in a site-specific performance. Following the residency, the museum will release a publication with contributions from artists Dawoud Bey and Allison Janae Hamilton as well as poet Ronaldo Wilson among others.

Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator.

Main Gallery Apr 06, 2018 - Jul 29, 2018

Terry Winters

Facts and Fictions

Terry Winters, //7-Fold Sequence, One//, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Terry Winters, //7-Fold Sequence, One//, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Terry Winters, //7-Fold Sequence, One//, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Terry Winters, 7-Fold Sequence, One, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

A leading figure in the art world for four decades, Terry Winters became well known in the 1980s for his materially-conscious drawings and paintings. Representing the patterns and schema that undergird physical and intellectual life—French philosopher Gilles Deleuze is cited as an important reference—Winters’s drawings of grids, networks, and knots illustrate complex encounters between biological drives, technological systems, and mental processes. The Drawing Center’s Main Gallery will present an overview of Winters’s drawings from 1980 to the present including full cycles of drawings, such as File Drawings (2009), as well as a selection of large-scale works on paper that foreground the overarching theme of Winters’s practice: the desire to make sense, however fictively, of the manner in which the visible world is constructed and received. Rather than offering a comprehensive drawing retrospective, the show will be organized with an eye to morphological relationships so that, as viewers move through the gallery, they will recall and ideally return to earlier related images.

Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator.

Image: Terry Winters, 7-Fold Sequence, One, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Drawing Room Apr 06, 2018 - Jul 29, 2018

Hipkiss

Bulwark

Hipkiss, Image of six works from the series //The Towers//, 2015–ongoing. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 Paper, 90 x 15 inches each. Courtesy of the artists. Hipkiss, Image of six works from the series //The Towers//, 2015–ongoing. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 Paper, 90 x 15 inches each. Courtesy of the artists. Hipkiss, Image of six works from the series //The Towers//, 2015–ongoing. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 Paper, 90 x 15 inches each. Courtesy of the artists.

Hipkiss, Image of six works from the series The Towers, 2015–ongoing. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 Paper, 90 x 15 inches each. Courtesy of the artists.

Praised for their meticulously-detailed panoramic landscapes, Anglo-French artists Alpha and Chris Mason, known collectively as Hipkiss, have been collaborating for three decades on intricate drawings that interweave dystopian narratives with a personal lexicon of symbolic forms. Past works by Hipkiss chronicle fictional histories of warring clans, urban crusades, and quasi-apocalyptical societies. For Bulwark, the artists’ first solo museum show in New York, Hipkiss will present the most recent cycle of drawings in their series The Towers (2015–ongoing). The drawings pull from the myriad allegorical significance of towers as symbols for transcendence, irrational ambition, and piety.

Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Hipkiss, Image of six works from the series The Towers, 2015–ongoing. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 Paper, 90 x 15 inches each. Courtesy of the artists.

The Lab Apr 06, 2018 - Apr 22, 2018

Eduardo Navarro

Into our cells

Eduardo Navarro, //Metabolic Drawings//, 2016. Edible ink on edible paper, 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler. Eduardo Navarro, //Metabolic Drawings//, 2016. Edible ink on edible paper, 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler. Eduardo Navarro, //Metabolic Drawings//, 2016. Edible ink on edible paper, 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler.

Eduardo Navarro, Metabolic Drawings, 2016. Edible ink on edible paper, 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler.

The Drawing Center will commission a new project by Argentinian artist Eduardo Navarro for The Lab. For this project, Navarro will produce a series of edible drawings, entitled Into our cells, which will be drawn with edible ink on edible paper with frames made of bread and sugar glass. In a closing feast, the audience will participate in Navarro’s project by consuming the drawings.

This project stems from Navarro’s interest in quantum physics, specifically the “holographic principle,” which describes how matter is scrambled and not destroyed in a black hole. Into our cells will explore how the consumption of a series of drawings can serve as a new mode of contemplation and create a situation in which our understanding of aesthetics bypasses the primacy of the eye and the visual. Through this commission, Navarro is interested in addressing the following questions: What would happen if one ate a drawing? Could our metabolism truly destroy this image? Would this drawing transform into fat, slowly become energy over time, and translate into action back in the world? Or, would the image become a ghost that inhabits the body like a house?

Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Image: Eduardo Navarro, Metabolic Drawings, 2016. Edible ink on edible paper, 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler.