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Main Gallery Feb 22, 2019 - Mar 24, 2019

Winter Term 2019

The Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP)

To prepare for Winter Term 2019, please read this interview with The Center for Urban Pedagogy's Executive Director Christine Gaspar via Design Feast.


Winter Term is an annual initiative in which The Drawing Center partners with an artist or organization whose mission it is to explore the transformative role that drawing can play in civic and global society. The second session engages The Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP), a Brooklyn-based organization that leverages graphic design and illustration to bring transparency to complex civic structures (e.g., land use, labor rights, immigration rights, juvenile detention) in partnership with the communities impacted by them. The typical end product—multi-language posters, pocket-sized booklets, and hands-on toolkits—ensures ease of access and dissemination to those constituencies who need them most: immigrants, street vendors, and public housing residents, among others.


CUP’s residency at The Drawing Center documents the organization’s process by following one project from CUP’s 2018–19 season: “Immigrants & NY,” a guide explaining civil rights and protections for immigrants at risk of deportation (Designer: Luiza Dale; Community Partner: The New York Immigration Coalition). The residency features an exhibition in which the project is broken down visually from its conception through its design, testing, and distribution. There will also be a series of events geared towards individuals wishing to learn more about community-engaged design, as well as an on-site store where individuals can browse and purchase past and current posters from CUP’s Making Policy Public program.


Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator; Rosario Guiraldes, Assistant Curator and Open Sessions Curator; and Peter Ahlberg, Exhibition Designer


PUBLIC PROGRAMS


As part of the exhibition, the Center for Urban Pedagogy will offer a series of public programs for adults and youth that share the organization’s unique methodology. Programs include an opportunity to meet CUP’s latest collaborators at the 2019 Making Policy Public + Public Access Design Launch Party, a panel discussion about using illustration to represent diverse communities, and interactive workshops using CUP’s What Is Zoning? and Sewer in a Suitcase toolkits.


Thursday, February 21, 6–8pm, All are welcome, no RSVP needed
Opening reception


Monday, February 25, 6:30–8pm, $5 via Eventbrite here
Using Illustration to Represent Diverse Communities
Panel discussion on representation in illustration with Lizania Cruz, Njoki Gitahi, and Erin Rommel, see bios via Eventbrite link above
Moderated by Christine Gaspar (Executive Director, CUP)


How can illustration be used as a tool to represent diverse communities? How can designers use their work to combat bias and disrupt common stereotypes? Designers, artists, and illustrators will discuss their experiences working with community-based organizations and CUP on "popular education materials,” or tools that use visuals and accessible text to make complex issues easy to understand. Hear about lessons learned and how these artists were able to create visual tools that were culturally sensitive and responsive to the communities they were partnering with, and what they learned along the way.


Thursday, February 28, 3–6pm [Repeats on Thursday, March 7], $5 via Eventbrite here
Designing with Communities
Methodology workshop for adults with Christine Gaspar (Executive Director, CUP) and CUP staff


This interactive workshop will introduce participants to CUP’s unique and award-winning community-engaged design methodology. How can you use design and art to help contribute to real community change? How can you build a partnership with a community you are not a part of? Attendees will learn from CUP’s Executive Director Christine Gaspar and other staff about how CUP facilitates its projects with community-based organizations and designers, helping to bridge their worlds to create visually-based explanations of complex policies and processes.


Saturday, March 2, 11am-1pm [Repeats on Saturday, March 9] $5 via Eventbrite here
What is Zoning?
Workshop for adults with CUP Community Education Program staff


Zoning law regulates land use across the city and shapes buildings, blocks, and whole neighborhoods. How does it work? Why is it so controversial? This interactive workshop helps explain the zoning of density, bulk, land use, and how proposed rezonings could affect your neighborhood. Learn the basics (or build up to topics like inclusionary and contextual zoning) while maxing out your lot with plastic block buildings or laying out a brand new city.


Thursday, March 7, 3–6pm $5 via Eventbrite here
Designing with Communities
Methodology workshop for adults with Christine Gaspar (Executive Director, CUP) and CUP staff


This interactive workshop will introduce participants to CUP’s unique and award-winning community-engaged design methodology. How can you use design and art to help contribute to real community change? How can you build a partnership with a community you are not a part of? Attendees will learn from CUP’s Executive Director Christine Gaspar and other staff about how CUP facilitates its projects with community-based organizations and designers, helping to bridge their worlds to create visually-based explanations of complex policies and processes.


Saturday, March 9, 11am–1pm $5 via Eventbrite here
What is Zoning?
Workshop for adults with CUP Community Education Program staff.


Zoning law regulates land use across the city and shapes buildings, blocks, and whole neighborhoods. How does it work? Why is it so controversial? This interactive workshop helps explain the zoning of density, bulk, land use, and how proposed rezonings could affect your neighborhood. Learn the basics (or build up to topics like inclusionary and contextual zoning) while maxing out your lot with plastic block buildings or laying out a brand new city.


Saturday, March 16, 11am–1pm $5 via Eventbrite here
Sewer in a Suitcase
Workshop for kids with a CUP Youth Education Program Manager.


New York City uses over one billion gallons of water every day. What happens to it after we’ve used it? Sewer in a Suitcase is a working model of New York City’s sewer system that helps demystify the hidden workings of the City’s water infrastructure by following the journey water takes beyond the drain. The workshop, suitable for all ages, demonstrates our sewer system in action, and introduces concepts like urban watersheds, water infrastructure, and the health impacts of water pollution.


Winter Term 2019: The Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP) is made possible by Fiona and Eric Rudin, Lisa Silver and Jean-Christophe Castelli, Wagner Foundation, and Isabel Stainow Wilcox.

Image: ©the Center for Urban Pedagogy, 2018. Distribution event for Making Policy Public publication, Rent Regulation Rights, March 9, 2014, Sara D. Roosevelt Park, Chinatown, New York City. This project is a collaboration of designers Intracollaborative, community organization CAAAV, and CUP. This MPP helps rent-stabilized tenants in Chinatown and the Lower East Side to understand their rights, fight landlord harassment, and collectively organize to stay in their homes.

The Lab Feb 22, 2019 - Mar 24, 2019

Open Sessions 14

Spirit Level

\\Sharon Madanes, //Natural Light Humanizes//, 2017. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 54 x 60 inches. \\Sharon Madanes, //Natural Light Humanizes//, 2017. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 54 x 60 inches. \\Sharon Madanes, //Natural Light Humanizes//, 2017. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 54 x 60 inches.


Sharon Madanes, Natural Light Humanizes, 2017. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 54 x 60 inches.

Join us for the Opening Reception on Thursday, February 21, 6-8pm. No RSVP necessary. Concurrently that evening you can view Winter Term 2019: The Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP) for its Opening Reception.


Spirit Level: Open Sessions 14 will explore materials that bear witness to suspended states common to “waiting” in relationship to the practice of drawing. The exhibition gathers components that characterize the waiting room—of a doctor’s office, the Department of Motor Vehicle, or a bus depot, for example—where strangers assemble in varying degrees of temporary stasis. The waiting room at The Drawing Center will serve as a space for drawing and rituals that will guide visitors through a variety of life’s transitions. The visible elements in the exhibition are a stage for a performance or an activity in the making. Here the collective voice of Open Sessions’ artists sets in motion an absurd play, incorporating the behaviors (norms and otherwise) of waiting in a designated space. Diagrams, charts, blueprints, drawings, videos, and schematics will explore the passage from one place to another; the transformation of line to form; and the metaphysical shift to some place unknown. This exhibition features the work of Mike Crane, Kunlin He, Victoria Keddie, Lux Lindner, Sharon Madanes, and Guadalupe Maravilla.


From October 12 through December 2019, Open Sessions presents five exhibitions organized by Rosario Güiraldes and Lisa Sigal, Open Sessions Curators, together with participating artists. Conceived and organized over fourteen months, The Lab or the Drawing Room exhibitions present experimental work and ideas, and take the form of thematic group shows. In the second year of the cycle, Open Sessions curators organize a full-museum exhibition to which all Open Sessions artists contribute work that best manifests and/or expands what drawing is.


Mike Crane is an artist based in New York. His work has been exhibited at Documenta 14, Kassel; Haus der Kulturen der Welt and The Berlinale Forum Expanded, both Berlin; Orgy Park and The Bronx Museum, both New York; and the Center for Contemporary Art, Derry, Northern Ireland. Crane was an artist in residence at Banff Center, Alberta, Canada; Rupert Centre Vilnius, Lithuania; MacDowell Colony, New Hampshire; Smack Mellon and Triangle Arts Association, both New York.


Kunlin He is an artist who lives and works in San Francisco, California. His art explores contemporary visual culture and the methodology of Chinese studies and Sinophone studies in performance, essay, film, painting, and installation. He attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2018 and has been selected as a finalist for the 2019 SFMoMA SECA Award.


Victoria Keddie is an artist working within the cross-disciplines of sound, video, installation, and performance. Keddie has devoted her work and research to an expanded use of media with a particular focus on broadcasting and the use of electromagnetic energies. She lives and works in New York City.


Lux Lindner is a visual artist and performer living in Buenos Aires. His artwork often deals with themes of memory, national identity, and a doomed technological sublime.


Sharon Madanes lives and works in New York. Her current art practice focuses on the rituals, aesthetics, and ethics of medicine, as contextualized within the banal and institutional surroundings in which doctors treat patients, and in which patients wait. Sharon completed her MFA at Hunter College and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2014. She is currently completing a medical degree at Columbia University.


Guadalupe Maravilla (formally Irvin Morazan) was part of the first wave of undocumented children to arrive at the United States border in the 1980s from Central America. In his multidisciplinary work, he creates and choreographs fictionalized rituals that incorporate his pre-colonial ancestry, fiction, and autobiography. His drawings, performances, and videos portray the “undocumented” as the protagonist of his work. His art often addresses a hybrid of border politics and fictional practices and creates new visual memories for the entangled genealogy of the border crossing stories.


Open Sessions Artists 2018–20:
Joeun Aatchim, Kenseth Armstead, Bahar Behbahani, Keren Benenisty, Katarina Burin, Esteban Cabeza de Baca, Alex Callender, Crystal Z Campbell, Ludovica Carbotta, Jesse Chun, Liz Collins, Mike Crane, Dennis RedMoon Darkeem, Theodore Darst, Billy and Steven Dufala, Joanthan Ehrenberg, Carolina Fusilier, Rachel Granofsky, LaMont Hamilton, Kunlin He, Victoria Keddie, Young Joo Lee, Lux Linder, Sharon Madanes, Guadalupe Maravilla, Zatara McIntyre, Ester Partegàs, Omid Shekari, Tariku Shiferaw, Johanna Unzueta, Cosmo Whyte


Open Sessions is made possible by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, the Evelyn Toll Family Foundation, and, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.


Image: Sharon Madanes, Natural Light Humanizes, 2017. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 54 x 60 inches.

Main Gallery and Drawing Room Apr 12, 2019 - Jul 28, 2019

Neo Rauch

Aus dem Boden / From the Floor

\\Neo Rauch, //Der Stammbaum//, 2017. Oil on paper, 66 1/4 x 81 3/8 inches. \\Neo Rauch, //Der Stammbaum//, 2017. Oil on paper, 66 1/4 x 81 3/8 inches. \\Neo Rauch, //Der Stammbaum//, 2017. Oil on paper, 66 1/4 x 81 3/8 inches.


Neo Rauch, Der Stammbaum, 2017. Oil on paper, 66 1/4 x 81 3/8 inches.


Neo Rauch is one of the best-known artists from the Leipzig school in Germany. His psychologically complex paintings have been widely collected and written about for more than twenty years. Neo Rauch: Aus dem Boden / From the Floor will be the first exhibition entirely devoted to his drawing in the United States. A collaboration between The Drawing Center and the Des Moines Art Center, the show will be presented first in Des Moines from September 27, 2018–January 6, 2019, with the catalogue published and distributed at that time. In Spring 2019, the exhibition will travel to The Drawing Center where it will be on view in the Main Gallery and Drawing Room for four months.

Co-organized by Brett Littman, former Executive Director of The Drawing Center and Jeff Fleming, Director of the Des Moines Art Center, Iowa, with Amber Harper, Assistant Curator.

Image: Neo Rauch, Die Eselpfleger, 2013. Felt-tip pen and oil on paper, 8 1/4 x 11 5/8 inches.

The Lab Apr 12, 2019 - Jul 28, 2019

As If

Alternative Histories from Then to Now

Sun Ra, //Sun Ra Discipline 27-II//, 1973. Cover artwork by: LeRoy Butler, Album cover, 12 3/8 x 12 3/8 inches. Collection of John Corbett and Terri Kapsalis. Reproduced courtesy Sun Ra LLC. Sun Ra, //Sun Ra Discipline 27-II//, 1973. Cover artwork by: LeRoy Butler, Album cover, 12 3/8 x 12 3/8 inches. Collection of John Corbett and Terri Kapsalis. Reproduced courtesy Sun Ra LLC. Sun Ra, //Sun Ra Discipline 27-II//, 1973. Cover artwork by: LeRoy Butler, Album cover, 12 3/8 x 12 3/8 inches. Collection of John Corbett and Terri Kapsalis. Reproduced courtesy Sun Ra LLC.

Sun Ra, Sun Ra Discipline 27-II, 1973. Cover artwork by: LeRoy Butler, Album cover, 12 3/8 x 12 3/8 inches. Collection of John Corbett and Terri Kapsalis. Reproduced courtesy Sun Ra LLC.


As If: Alternative Histories from Then to Now opens in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery on April 12, 2019. The works in multiple mediums in this exhibition offer examples of how we might reimagine historical narratives in order to contend with the traumas of contemporary life. These works of consummate draftsmanship exemplify the skill of drawing and the imagination of artists at work turning fantasies into plausible realities—absurd, amusing, and sometimes terrifying. Whether exacerbating the contradictions of present society or imagining genuinely alternative utopias, the participating authors and artists traverse science fiction, popular culture, and genuine aesthetic thought-experiments. Spanning a historical era transformed by war, racial and economic inequity, authoritarianism, and the persistent fear of imminent apocalypse, these works offer alternative understandings of our present by rewiring the past.


History is always up for grabs. For centuries, writers, philosophers, and artists have speculated about historical narratives that run counter to actual historical events. What if, in 1859, John Brown’s successful raid on Harpers Ferry led to the establishment of a socialist nation called Nova Africa? What if, a few years later, in 1865, Susan B. Anthony became a gun-toting outlaw? A British General Strike in 1926 was a triumph? The Axis powers won World War II? Dewey defeated Truman? Raccoons or mosquitos evolved into the earth’s dominant species? Working towards utopian, reactionary, or simply ambiguous ends, the artists, writers, and amateur science fiction enthusiasts in this exhibition use the playground of history as a foundation on which to construct alternatives to the stark realities of the present—whether amplifying its inherent contradictions or imagining a better world.


Presented in As If: Alternative Histories from Then to Now are early speculative fiction publications from the mid 20th century, including the British wartime fanzine Futurian War Digest and ongoing science fiction magazine Interzone (1982–present), on loan from the Special Collections of the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Book covers for Joanna Russ’s The Female Man, Philip K. Dick’s The Man in High Castle, Norman Spinrad’s Iron Dream, Martin Cruz Smith’s The Indians Won, and Ward Moore’s Bring the Jubilee are accompanied by album covers from the discography of Sun Ra and prints of Jack Kirby’s Lord of Light series, as well as the original ink drawing for the cover of Avengers #87, featuring Marvel’s T’Challa, the Black Panther, illustrated by John Buscema. These items are complemented by contemporary works on paper by artists including Huma Bhabha, Joe Bradley, Vivian Caccuri, Keith Mayerson, and Cauleen Smith.

Organized by Giampaolo Bianconi, guest curator, and Isabella Kapur, Curatorial Assistant, The Drawing Center.

Image: Sun Ra, Sun Ra Discipline 27-II, 1973. Cover artwork by: LeRoy Butler, Album cover, 12 3/8 x 12 3/8 inches. Collection of John Corbett and Terri Kapsalis. Reproduced courtesy Sun Ra LLC.