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Main Gallery Jul 08, 2015 - Jul 10, 2015

Drawing Sound Part I: Billy Martin

Billy Martin aka Illy B, //Veve 32, 2009//, Ink on paper , 13.5 x 11 inches, Courtesy of the artist. Billy Martin aka Illy B, //Veve 32, 2009//, Ink on paper , 13.5 x 11 inches, Courtesy of the artist. Billy Martin aka Illy B, //Veve 32, 2009//, Ink on paper , 13.5 x 11 inches, Courtesy of the artist.

Billy Martin aka Illy B, Veve 32, 2009, Ink on paper , 13.5 x 11 inches, Courtesy of the artist.


DOORS WILL OPEN AT 7PM. Performances will begin at 7:30pm and end approx. 9pm. First come, first serve. Standing only, no seating.

For its 2015–16 season, The Drawing Center has developed two multi-evening events for its newly renovated galleries that demonstrate the institution’s increased focus on the intersections between drawing, sound, and performance-based art. Interspersed between major exhibitions, Drawing Sound will bring commissions of new work to The Drawing Center’s space and will build upon the institution’s recent explorations of drawing and music in the work of Iannis Xenakis and William Engelen. Billy Martin and String Noise (Conrad Harris and Pauline Kim) will curate the two Drawing Sound performances in July and September of 2015, respectively.

Co-produced by Brett Littman, Executive Director and Jessica Man, Curatorial Assistant.

Part 1: Billy Martin
For the Wandering performance series in July of 2015, Martin has invited world-renowned musicians to interpret and perform his graphic scores and automatic drawings. Set list for each night is subject to change.

Night 1 - July 8, 7:30pm | Go here to buy tickets.
Soloists: Chris Cochrane (guitar), Billy Martin (percussion), John Medeski (keyboard synthesizer), Ikue Mori (electronics), and Ned Rothenberg (clarinets, saxophone, shakuhachi)
Interpreting Billy Martin's graphic scores

Ensemble: Alarm Will Sound (vibraphone, marimba, clarinet, trombone, viola, gongs) with guests Chris Cochrane, John Medeski, and Ned Rothenberg
Performing Coral Sea, Heart Strings, The Animated Veve, Chaman

Night 2 - July 9, 7:30pm | Go here to buy tickets.
Soloists: Cyro Baptista (percussion, voice) and Anthony Coleman (keyboards)
Interpreting Billy Martin's graphic scores

Yoshiko Chuma (dancer) and Billy Martin (percussion)
Performing Pas de deux

Ensemble: Fang Percussion (3-20 percussionists)
Performing Stridulations for the Good Luck Feast (for temple blocks and bamboo) and Drawing Sound (gongs, water phone and other metallics)

Night 3 - July 10, 7:30pm | Go here to buy tickets.
Soloists: Annie Gosfield (electronics) and Billy Martin (percussion)
Interpreting Billy Martin's graphic scores

Paul Auster (spoken word) and Hal Willner (tape machines)
Reflections on the wandering mind, improvisation, and chance

Ensemble: Sirius Quartet (violins, viola, cello)

Performing Sam, My Morning Feldman, Stridulations, and Martin's graphic score


Throughout the three-day event, Stridulations for the Good Luck Feast, a “scentstallation” by Phaedra Martin that encompasses sound, visuals, and scent, will be installed in the Drawing Room.


Drawing Sound will continue September 11–13, 2015, when String Noise will present a three-night event featuring different performers at The Drawing Center. See details here.


Drawing Sound is made possible by the support of an anonymous donor, Charles Price, Galia Meiri-Stawski and Axel Stawski, and Isabel Stainow Wilcox.

Image: Billy Martin aka Illy B, Veve 32, 2009, Ink on paper , 13.5 x 11 inches, Courtesy of the artist.

Main Gallery Jul 17, 2015 - Aug 30, 2015

Name It by Trying to Name It: Open Sessions 2014-15

Jimbo Blachly, //Drawing Wagon//, 2015, Paper, ink, wood, Dimensions variable
Courtesy of the artist.
Jimbo Blachly, //Drawing Wagon//, 2015, Paper, ink, wood, Dimensions variable
Courtesy of the artist.
Jimbo Blachly, //Drawing Wagon//, 2015, Paper, ink, wood, Dimensions variable
Courtesy of the artist.

Jimbo Blachly, Drawing Wagon, 2015, Paper, ink, wood, Dimensions variable
Courtesy of the artist.

Initiated in 2014, Open Sessions is a new program at The Drawing Center through which a large group of artists consider their relationship to drawing as medium, process, and metaphor. Working together over a two-year period, Open Sessions artists participate in ongoing studio visits and discussions, punctuated by small group exhibitions at The Drawing Center, as well as other self-organized shows in New York and abroad.

Name It by Trying to Name It: Open Sessions 2014-15 includes all artists in the program, giving the first floor of the museum over to an exploration of contemporary drawing, encompassing performance, video, sculpture, and installation, as well as traditional drawing forms. The show's numerous collaborations, in which ideas and materials are shared, emphasize the medium's flexibility and process-oriented nature. The exhibition will evolve over its six-week run, as some artworks enter and exit in two-week cycles, while others remain constant throughout the show's run. Taken as a whole, Name It by Trying to Name It presents a window into nearly two years of thinking about drawing.

Organized by Nova Benway and Lisa Sigal, Curators of the Open Sessions program.

Open Sessions is made possible by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Faber-Castell, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Image: Jimbo Blachly, Drawing Wagon, 2015, Paper, ink, wood, Dimensions variable
Courtesy of the artist.

The Lab Jul 17, 2015 - Aug 30, 2015

Robin Rhode: Drawing Waves

Robin Rhode, //Breaking Waves//, 2014 , One of sixteen C-prints, 14 x 24 inches each, Courtesy of the artist.
Robin Rhode, //Breaking Waves//, 2014 , One of sixteen C-prints, 14 x 24 inches each, Courtesy of the artist.
Robin Rhode, //Breaking Waves//, 2014 , One of sixteen C-prints, 14 x 24 inches each, Courtesy of the artist.

Robin Rhode, Breaking Waves, 2014 , One of sixteen C-prints, 14 x 24 inches each, Courtesy of the artist.

In Drawing Waves, South African–born, German-based artist Robin Rhode will exhibit his signature, stop-action photographs (in which he draws in public streets and then a performer interacts with the inscribed image) in a new photographic sequence entitled, Breaking Waves, 2014-15, which whimsically depicts a young boy surfing in the sea. The illusionistic swell of the waves–articulated by Rhode’s drawn gestures onto a dilapidated city wall–reiterates the boy’s deft maneuvering of the ocean and this type of athletic physicality is echoed in the accompanying wall drawing Paries Pictus-Draw The Waves, 2015. Rhode will partner with a group of children aged 8-10 years to create this large-scale mural of the high seas, which will be video recorded and on view. He begins the process by attaching vinyl cutouts of seventeenth century mercantile ships to the gallery wall, and then invites the children to freely draw the surrounding body of water using giant, custom-made oil crayons. The nautical motif is largely inspired by the East India Company fleet, who were the first colonialists in Southern Africa—a nod to Rhode’s own childhood and the indignities he faced growing up in a post-apartheid South Africa. Yet as a participatory artwork, Rhode offers a more hopeful message by bringing urban youth culture to the fore and demonstrating the power of pure imagination.

Curated by Joanna Kleinberg Romanow, Adjunct Assistant Curator.

Robin Rhode: Drawing Waves is made possible by the Wagner Family Foundation and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong. Special thanks to Allison and Larry Berg.

Image: Robin Rhode, Breaking Waves, 2014 , One of sixteen C-prints, 14 x 24 inches each, Courtesy of the artist. Collection of Allison & Larry Berg.

Drawing Room Aug 05, 2015 - Aug 30, 2015

Open Sessions 4

Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki, //Dictionary of the Hole//, 2012  Photograph , dimensions variable (complete work includes text). Courtesy of the artists. Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki, //Dictionary of the Hole//, 2012  Photograph , dimensions variable (complete work includes text). Courtesy of the artists. Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki, //Dictionary of the Hole//, 2012  Photograph , dimensions variable (complete work includes text). Courtesy of the artists.

Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki, Dictionary of the Hole, 2012 Photograph , dimensions variable (complete work includes text). Courtesy of the artists.

Open Sessions will continue with artist-directed group exhibitions. This exhibition will feature the work of Colleen Asper & Marika Kandelaki, Matt Bua, Maurice Carlin (with Anne Gilman, Ethan Hayes-Chute, Annette Knol, Elizabeth Leister and Michael Namkung), Kerry Downey, Nicolas Dumit Estevez and Laia Sole, Maximilian Goldfarb, Brad Killam, Kamau Patton, and Lior Shvil.

Organized by the artists and Nova Benway and Lisa Sigal, Curators of the Open Sessions program.

Open Sessions is made possible by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Faber-Castell, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Image: Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki, Dictionary of the Hole, 2012 Photograph , dimensions variable (complete work includes text). Courtesy of the artists.

Main Gallery Sep 11, 2015 - Sep 13, 2015

Drawing Sound Part II: String Noise

Jad Fair Jad Fair Jad Fair

Jad Fair

Ticket buying details to come.

For its 2015–16 season, The Drawing Center has developed two multi-evening events for its newly renovated galleries that demonstrate the institution’s increased focus on the intersections between drawing, sound, and performance-based art. Interspersed between major exhibitions, Drawing Sound will bring commissions of new work to The Drawing Center’s space and will build upon the institution’s recent explorations of drawing and music in the work of Iannis Xenakis and William Engelen. Billy Martin and String Noise (Conrad Harris and Pauline Kim) will curate the two Drawing Sound performances in July and September of 2015, respectively.

Produced by Brett Littman, Executive Director and Jessica Man, Curatorial Assistant.

Part II: String Noise

In the fall, String Noise will present a three-night event, featuring different performers each night. Alvin Lucier will perform Bird and Person Dyning. Jad Fair, primarily known as the co-founder of the lo-fi alternative rock group Half Japanese will also perform, in front of projections of his paper cut-outs, several of which have been featured on his album covers. Greg Saunier of Deerhoof, an American punk rock band, will also perform.

Throughout the three-day event, Echoic Memory Forms, a site-specific sound piece by artist and composer Spencer Topel, will be installed in the Drawing Room.

Image: Jad Fair.

Drawing Sound is made possible by the support of an anonymous donor, Charles Price, Galia Meiri-Stawski and Axel Stawski, and Isabel Stainow Wilcox.

Main Gallery Oct 02, 2015 - Dec 20, 2015

Richard Pousette-Dart: 1930s

Richard Pousette-Dart, //Agony//, 1930s, Graphite, ink, and wash on paper, 18 ½ x 14 ⅞ inches. Photographer: Jason Wierzbicki. Courtesy of The Richard Pousette-Dart Estate. Richard Pousette-Dart, //Agony//, 1930s, Graphite, ink, and wash on paper, 18 ½ x 14 ⅞ inches. Photographer: Jason Wierzbicki. Courtesy of The Richard Pousette-Dart Estate. Richard Pousette-Dart, //Agony//, 1930s, Graphite, ink, and wash on paper, 18 ½ x 14 ⅞ inches. Photographer: Jason Wierzbicki. Courtesy of The Richard Pousette-Dart Estate.

Richard Pousette-Dart, Agony, 1930s, Graphite, ink, and wash on paper, 18 ½ x 14 ⅞ inches. Photographer: Jason Wierzbicki. Courtesy of The Richard Pousette-Dart Estate.

Best known as a founding member of the New York School of painting, Richard Pousette-Dart (1916-1992) initially pursued a career as a sculptor. The son of Nathaniel Pousette, a painter, art director, educator, and art writer, and Flora Louise Dart, a poet and musician, Pousette-Dart was raised in an environment surrounded by music, poetry, and the visual arts, and began drawing and painting by the age of eight. Introduced to African, Oceanic, and Native American art by his father, Pousette-Dart made frequent visits to the Museum of Natural History as a young man. In 1938, he forged a close friendship with John Graham, whose writings were closely aligned with his own interests in spiritual concerns and so-called primitive art. Throughout the 1930s, Pousette-Dart was most entranced by the work of Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, whose abstract sculptures, drawings, and forms in brass greatly informed the orientation of the young American artist.

The Drawing Center exhibition will be the first in-depth consideration of Richard Pousette-Dart’s drawings from the 1930s, a period when the artist pursued directly-carved sculpture, yet also painted, experimented with photography, and created numerous works on paper. These early drawings explore Pousette-Dart’s concerns about sculpture and working three-dimensionally, and many reference the figure through full-frontal or profile views as they consider space, orientation, and volume. Additionally, numerous studies allude to dance, animal forms, masks, and heads, and many examples offer an accumulation of abstract and geometric forms, particularly for his brasses—small sculptures meant to be “held in the hand.” The exhibition will include approximately eighty works from the 1930s including drawings, notebooks, and brasses.

Curated by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Image: Richard Pousette-Dart, Agony, 1930s, Graphite, ink, and wash on paper, 18 ½ x 14 ⅞ inches. Photographer: Jason Wierzbicki. Courtesy of The Richard Pousette-Dart Estate.

Drawing Room Oct 02, 2015 - Dec 20, 2015

Rashid Johnson: Anxious Men

Rashid Johnson, //Untitled Anxious Men//, 2015. White ceramic tile, black soap, wax, 73 x 47 x 2 inches, © Rashid Johnson, Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Martin Parsekian.
Rashid Johnson, //Untitled Anxious Men//, 2015. White ceramic tile, black soap, wax, 73 x 47 x 2 inches, © Rashid Johnson, Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Martin Parsekian.
Rashid Johnson, //Untitled Anxious Men//, 2015. White ceramic tile, black soap, wax, 73 x 47 x 2 inches, © Rashid Johnson, Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Martin Parsekian.

Rashid Johnson, Untitled Anxious Men, 2015. White ceramic tile, black soap, wax, 73 x 47 x 2 inches, © Rashid Johnson, Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Martin Parsekian.

Since distinguishing himself as the youngest artist in Freestyle, the landmark exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 2001, Rashid Johnson has solidified his reputation as one of the pre-eminent artists of his generation. Invoking such wide-ranging themes as the black experience in America, the dialogue between abstraction and figuration, the relationship between art and personal identity, and the sense of anxiety and wonder that accompanies our movement through the world, Johnson has been discussed within the context of contemporary painting, photography, sculpture, video, installation art, and even performance. The one medium with which his work has rarely been associated is, paradoxically, one that intersects with all of the above and more, namely, drawing.

Rashid Johnson: Anxious Men aims to deepen our understanding of this influential artist’s work by highlighting a question at the core of his practice: what constitutes an artistic gesture and how does it make meaning? Even as Johnson’s work remains universally accessible employing common visual tropes such as the monochrome and the grid, it is also self-referential making specific allusion to his upbringing in Chicago and the Afro-centric values of his parents. In Rashid Johnson: Anxious Men, the artist will fully embrace the more personal aspect of his work in the intimate space of The Drawing Room gallery. The core of the exhibition is a new series of black-soap-and-wax-on-tile portraits that Johnson calls his “anxious men.” Small in size and executed by digging into a waxy surface they enact a kind of drawing through erasure and represent the first time Johnson has worked figuratively outside of photography or film and on such an intimate scale. The portraits will be set within a multi-sensorial environment that includes wallpaper featuring a photograph of the artist’s father from the year Johnson was born; a newly-commissioned silent video in which the artist plays a patient in dialogue with his therapist, legendary filmmaker Melvin Van Peebles; and a Van Peebles audio sound track. In this way, the exhibition will create an immersive space in which different material gestures and forms of expression combine and collide forcing us to confront who we are and what it means to be human.

Curated by Claire Gilman, Senior Curator.

Image: Rashid Johnson, Untitled Anxious Men, 2015. White ceramic tile, black soap, wax, 73 x 47 x 2 inches, © Rashid Johnson, Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Martin Parsekian.

The Lab Oct 02, 2015 - Oct 25, 2015

Open Sessions 5

Daniel Lichtman, //Broadcasting From A Secret Underground Bunker - One million views thanks for watching, Performance (12 min)//, live video projection, installation, Courtesy of the artist. Daniel Lichtman, //Broadcasting From A Secret Underground Bunker - One million views thanks for watching, Performance (12 min)//, live video projection, installation, Courtesy of the artist. Daniel Lichtman, //Broadcasting From A Secret Underground Bunker - One million views thanks for watching, Performance (12 min)//, live video projection, installation, Courtesy of the artist.

Daniel Lichtman, Broadcasting From A Secret Underground Bunker - One million views thanks for watching, Performance (12 min), live video projection, installation, Courtesy of the artist.

Open Sessions will continue with artist-directed group exhibitions. This exhibition will feature the work of Lauren Bakst, Jimbo Blachly, Daniel Lichtman, Yuri Masnyj, Laura Morrison, Catya Plate, Sarada Rauch, and Alfred Steiner.

Organized by the artists and Nova Benway and Lisa Sigal, Curators of the Open Sessions program.

Image: Daniel Lichtman, Broadcasting From A Secret Underground Bunker - One million views thanks for watching, Performance (12 min), live video projection, installation, Courtesy of the artist.

The Lab Nov 12, 2015 - Dec 20, 2015

Open Sessions 6

Ronny Quevedo, //Study for a portal #1//, 2012. Shoe polish and enamel on paper, 50 x 38 inches, Courtesy of the artist.
Ronny Quevedo, //Study for a portal #1//, 2012. Shoe polish and enamel on paper, 50 x 38 inches, Courtesy of the artist.
Ronny Quevedo, //Study for a portal #1//, 2012. Shoe polish and enamel on paper, 50 x 38 inches, Courtesy of the artist.

Ronny Quevedo, Study for a portal #1, 2012. Shoe polish and enamel on paper, 50 x 38 inches, Courtesy of the artist.

Open Sessions continues with artist-directed group exhibitions. This exhibition features the work of Amadeo Azar, Daniel Barroca, Youmna Chlala, Lea Cetera, Onyedika Chuke, Alexandra Lerman, Harold Mendez, Marcelo Moscheta, and Ronny Quevedo.

Organized by the artists and Nova Benway and Lisa Sigal, Curators of the Open Sessions program.

Image: Ronny Quevedo, Study for a portal #1, 2012. Shoe polish and enamel on paper, 50 x 38 inches, Courtesy of the artist.

Main Gallery Jan 22, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016

Louise Despont: The Subtle Body and Circulatory Drawings

Louise Despont, //Floor plan for Louise Despont: The Subtle Body and Circulatory Drawings//, 2014, Courtesy of the artist.
Louise Despont, //Floor plan for Louise Despont: The Subtle Body and Circulatory Drawings//, 2014, Courtesy of the artist.
Louise Despont, //Floor plan for Louise Despont: The Subtle Body and Circulatory Drawings//, 2014, Courtesy of the artist.

Louise Despont, Floor plan for Louise Despont: The Subtle Body and Circulatory Drawings, 2014, Courtesy of the artist.

For her first solo museum show in New York, artist Louise Despont has been commissioned by The Drawing Center to create a site-specific, large-scale architectural installation. While she is best known for her incredibly complex and unique drawings on antique paper, for The Subtle Body and Circulatory Drawings she will be designing two contrasting built structures, both of which are informed by her recent travels to Bali. The first structure will be a rectangular, roofed room, its exterior surface covered with cut dowel pegs. Inside, Despont will install a series of abstract drawings depicting different circulatory systems. The second structure will be an open-roof oval room, its exterior covered by a loosely draped linen cloth. Inside, Despont will install a five foot high by sixty foot long frieze-like drawing that will completely fill the interior walls. This unified drawing will explore and visualize energy paths found in the natural world.

Curated by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Image: Louise Despont, Floor plan for Louise Despont: The Subtle Body and Circulatory Drawings, 2014, Courtesy of the artist.

Drawing Room Jan 22, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital

Jennifer Bartlett, //Hospital, 2012//, Pastel on paper, 30 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Locks Gallery, Philadelphia. Photo by Joseph Hu.
Jennifer Bartlett, //Hospital, 2012//, Pastel on paper, 30 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Locks Gallery, Philadelphia. Photo by Joseph Hu.
Jennifer Bartlett, //Hospital, 2012//, Pastel on paper, 30 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Locks Gallery, Philadelphia. Photo by Joseph Hu.

Jennifer Bartlett, Hospital, 2012, Pastel on paper, 30 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Locks Gallery, Philadelphia. Photo by Joseph Hu.

Since her first one-person exhibition in New York in 1970, Jennifer Bartlett has been well-known for her process-based works exploring grids and other forms of order, which subvert these systems even as they work within their confines. Alongside this body of abstract work, Bartlett has also produced pastel drawings based on her immediate surroundings. These pastels are essential to understanding Bartlett’s vocal and critical rejection of the rigid distinction between abstraction and figuration, and highlight the fluidity between these ways of working in her practice.

The Hospital series of pastels was made during Bartlett’s extended hospital stay. These pastels are based on a series of photographs she took in the hospital that she later cropped and edited in her studio. With these works, Bartlett continues her long-established practice of close observation and responsiveness to her environment. The drawings mine the liminal experience of "hospital time." Hospital environments are often highly organized by routines of medication or physical therapy, while also filled with long moments of waiting and boredom. This combination often heightens one's awareness of minute details and Bartlett exploits these sensations to create images that eschew sentimentality while remaining indelibly poignant. The Drawing Center’s exhibition will be the first time these ten pastels will be on public view.

Curated by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Image: Jennifer Bartlett, Hospital, 2012, Pastel on paper, 30 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Locks Gallery, Philadelphia. Photo by Joseph Hu.

THE LAB Feb 19, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016

“Please Make This Look Nice”

Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller, //Poster for Cooper Union School of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series (detail)//, 1985. Paper, photostats, white paint, black marker, rubber cement, non-repro blue pencil, 26 1/2 x 44 inches. Courtesy The Herb Lubalin Study Center at The Cooper Union. Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller, //Poster for Cooper Union School of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series (detail)//, 1985. Paper, photostats, white paint, black marker, rubber cement, non-repro blue pencil, 26 1/2 x 44 inches. Courtesy The Herb Lubalin Study Center at The Cooper Union. Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller, //Poster for Cooper Union School of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series (detail)//, 1985. Paper, photostats, white paint, black marker, rubber cement, non-repro blue pencil, 26 1/2 x 44 inches. Courtesy The Herb Lubalin Study Center at The Cooper Union.

Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller, Poster for Cooper Union School of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series (detail), 1985. Paper, photostats, white paint, black marker, rubber cement, non-repro blue pencil, 26 1/2 x 44 inches. Courtesy The Herb Lubalin Study Center at The Cooper Union.

For “Please Make This Look Nice”: The Graphic Design Process as an Act of Drawing a simulated studio will be installed in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery. A series of invited designers will occupy the gallery while they work on solving unique graphic design problems (type design, logotype, book cover, poster, editorial, motion, and more) assigned by the curator. The physical manifestations of their processes will be output, displayed, projected, and streamed live.

This project specifically posits the idea that the graphic design process is itself an act of drawing, as worthy of intensive exploration as the final products. The exhibition looks to expand the most basic understanding of graphic design by turning attention away from finished design solutions—the “what” of graphic design—to consider the “how” and “why,” focusing on the myriad techniques and methodologies involved in the process (writing, mood boarding, traditional drawing/illustration, collage, storyboarding, research, collecting, and digital drawing). By looking at this process as a non-linear drawing practice, the connections between research, inspiration, tangents, digressions, experimentation, brainstorming, play, refinement, collaboration, and execution are revealed. Demystifying the creative process and moving beyond what is often seen as either a simply stylistic or purely strategy-driven enterprise, this project aims to provide a new basis upon which we may understand the work that comprises our visual world.

Curated by Peter Ahlberg, AHL&CO, New York.

Image: Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller, Poster for Cooper Union School of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series (detail), 1985. Paper, photostats, white paint, black marker, rubber cement, non-repro blue pencil, 26 1/2 x 44 inches. Courtesy The Herb Lubalin Study Center at The Cooper Union.

Main Gallery, Drawing Room, and The Lab Apr 15, 2016 - Jun 12, 2016

Drawing Dialogues: The Sol LeWitt Collection

Hanne Darboven, //Zeichnung//, 1968, Ink on paper. 39 3/8 x 27 1/2 inches. LeWitt Collection, Chester, CT.
Hanne Darboven, //Zeichnung//, 1968, Ink on paper. 39 3/8 x 27 1/2 inches. LeWitt Collection, Chester, CT.
Hanne Darboven, //Zeichnung//, 1968, Ink on paper. 39 3/8 x 27 1/2 inches. LeWitt Collection, Chester, CT.

Hanne Darboven, Zeichnung, 1968, Ink on paper. 39 3/8 x 27 1/2 inches. LeWitt Collection, Chester, CT.

Sol LeWitt’s status as one of the greatest American artists of the past half century is well established. What is less known is that LeWitt was also an avid collector who amassed during his lifetime an extraordinary ensemble of over seven thousand pieces by approximately seven hundred and fifty artists. The majority represent LeWitt’s friends and peers whom he admired and encouraged through purchase, exchange, and gifts; but the collection also reaches backwards and forwards in time to embrace art from other periods and cultures. The LeWitt collection is a remarkable example of an artist’s extraordinary curiosity and generosity, as well as a portrait of artistic developments in the 1960s and 70s, when European and American conceptual and minimal art came into their own. Indeed, the collection can be viewed as a lived archive of the world in which LeWitt moved and worked, even as it examines the possibilities for conceptual art across media, disciplines, and time periods.

It is this expansive vision that Drawing Dialogues: The Sol LeWitt Collection will explore through the lens of drawing specifically. The LeWitt collection contains (and the exhibition will show) classic examples of conceptual drawing from the movement’s key players like Mel Bochner and Hanne Darboven but it also includes work by artists such as Alighiero Boetti, Jan Dibbets, Eva Hesse, and Kazuko Miyamoto that investigates the parameters of mark-making in unexpected materials and formats. In addition, the exhibition will feature contributions by older artists whose methods inspired LeWitt’s own approach and younger artists whose work resonates with an earlier generation while extending the medium in new directions. Presenting over a hundred works by more than sixty artists in drawing, sculpture, photography, and installation, Drawing Dialogues: The Sol LeWitt Collection will re-examine conceptual art and the parameters of the drawn medium through the organizing lens of one of its greatest practitioners.

Curated by Claire Gilman, Senior Curator of The Drawing Center, and Béatrice Gross, Guest Curator.

Image: Hanne Darboven, Zeichnung, 1968, Ink on paper. 39 3/8 x 27 1/2 inches. LeWitt Collection, Chester, CT.

Main Gallery Jun 20, 2016 - Aug 01, 2016

2016 Prix Canson

The Prix Canson, one of the most prestigious annual drawing prizes in the world, is partnering with The Drawing Center to exhibit the works of their 2016 finalists from June 20 through July 1, 2016. Canson® and The Drawing Center are linked by their shared passion for drawing and by their ambition to promote art to wide and diverse audiences. Past Prix Canson exhibitions have been held in major museums and galleries in Paris and Barcelona. Previous winners of the Prix Canson have been: Fabien Mérelle (2010), Ronald Cornelissen (2011), Virginia Chihota (2013), and Simon Evans (2014). These winners represent the best artists today worldwide who are working with drawing. The Prix Canson president for 2016 is the world-renowned Brazilian artist Tunga. He will be joined by a jury of top museum directors, curators, and collectors in the art world. During the Prix Canson exhibition at The Drawing Center, Canson® will host a series of talks, presentations, and events with the finalists for the public and press. As well, Canson® will also create a special pop-up shop in The Drawing Center’s bookstore featuring one-of-kind items, specialty paper, and a wide selection of their artist sketch books.