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Main Gallery Oct 12, 2018 - Feb 03, 2019

For Opacity

Elijah Burgher, Toyin Ojih Odutola, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn

\\Toyin Ojih Odutola, //Paris Apartment//, 2016–17. Charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper, 59 3/8 x 42 inches. Private collection, New York. \\Toyin Ojih Odutola, //Paris Apartment//, 2016–17. Charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper, 59 3/8 x 42 inches. Private collection, New York. \\Toyin Ojih Odutola, //Paris Apartment//, 2016–17. Charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper, 59 3/8 x 42 inches. Private collection, New York.


Toyin Ojih Odutola, Paris Apartment, 2016–17. Charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper, 59 3/8 x 42 inches. Private collection, New York.

HOLIDAY NOTE: The Drawing Center will be closed Mon, Dec 24 – Tues, Jan 1. We are back in action on Wed, Jan 2. All our exhibitions are on view through February 3, 2019.

This fall, The Drawing Center presents an exhibition that focuses on three young artists—Elijah Burgher, Toyin Ojih Odutola, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn—who explore diverse identities through portraiture and who do so almost exclusively through the medium of drawing. These artists have entirely distinct stylistic approaches and personal backgrounds but they are connected by the way in which they use drawing to investigate subjecthood as well as its resistance to depiction. Indeed, Burgher, Ojih Odutola, and Quinn embrace drawing because it invests surface with the felt intimacy of touch while nonetheless confirming it to be a malleable and uncertain construct. Ultimately, in the intellectual tradition of French theorist Édouard Glissant, these artists believe that the right to refuse explanation is as integral to the formulation of selfhood as is revelation.


For Opacity: Elijah Burgher, Toyin Ojih Odutola, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is the first museum exhibition to concentrate on the work of Burgher and Quinn and follows on the heels of Ojih Odutola’s successful 2017 New York debut at the Whitney Museum of American Art. In the case of each artist, older drawings will be placed alongside work created expressly for The Drawing Center exhibition to foreground the artists’ sustained and developing dedication to their fields of inquiry. At the same time, the artists’ works will be interspersed throughout the exhibition space to allow for dialogue and cross-connections. Whether using a highly refined illusionistic approach (Burgher), a broad range of material techniques and media (Ojih Odutola), or a fractured, composite aesthetic (Quinn) the artists in For Opacity explore the relationship between insight and obscurity; what a surface can reveal and what it necessarily withholds.


Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator, with Amber Harper, Assistant Curator.

For Opacity: Elijah Burgher, Toyin Ojih Odutola, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is made possible by Almine Rech Gallery; Burger Collection, Hong Kong; Anderson Cooper; Fairfax Dorn and Marc Glimcher; Stephanie and Timothy Ingrassia; Jack Shainman Gallery; Kathleen Madden and Paul Frantz; Richard Gerrig and Timothy Peterson; Noel E. D. Kirnon; Thomas Lavin; Fiona and Eric Rudin; Beth Rudin DeWoody and Firooz Zahedi; Salon 94; Neil Tennant; Dr. Daniel S. Berger and Scott Wenthe; Rashid Johnson; M+B; P•P•O•W; Rhona Hoffman Gallery; Half Gallery; and Western Exhibitions.

Image: Toyin Ojih Odutola, Paris Apartment, 2016–17. Charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper, 59 3/8 x 42 inches. Courtesy of The Dean Collection. © Toyin Ojih Odutola. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.



CATALOGUE
Read Drawing Papers 138: For Opacity
Buy the catalogue.

Drawing Room Oct 12, 2018 - Feb 03, 2019

Jennifer Wynne Reeves

All Right for Now

\\Jennifer Wynne Reeves, //Bittersweet//, 2005. Gouache on paper, 11 x 14 inches. Courtesy of Jennifer Wynne Reeves Estate. \\Jennifer Wynne Reeves, //Bittersweet//, 2005. Gouache on paper, 11 x 14 inches. Courtesy of Jennifer Wynne Reeves Estate. \\Jennifer Wynne Reeves, //Bittersweet//, 2005. Gouache on paper, 11 x 14 inches. Courtesy of Jennifer Wynne Reeves Estate.


Jennifer Wynne Reeves, Bittersweet, 2005. Gouache on paper, 11 x 14 inches. Courtesy of Jennifer Wynne Reeves Estate.

HOLIDAY NOTE: The Drawing Center will be closed Mon, Dec 24 – Tues, Jan 1. We are back in action on Wed, Jan 2. All our exhibitions are on view through February 3, 2019.

Jennifer Wynne Reeves: All Right for Now opened in the Drawing Room on October 12. From the late 1990s until her too-early death from brain cancer in 2014, Jennifer Wynne Reeves (b. 1963, Royal Oak, MI) developed a reputation as an artist’s artist, garnering an intense and loyal following especially among fellow artists who appreciated her ability to load errant scribbles and globs of crusty paint with humor, narrativity, and poignant emotional affect. Her first museum show in New York, The Drawing Center exhibition is a long overdue consideration of Reeves’s unique contribution to the dialogue between representation and abstraction that has preoccupied recent art. Featuring works on paper, Masonite, and wood, as well as notebooks and text pieces (Reeves wrote copiously and had a large fan base on Facebook), the exhibition examines the power of line and color to render accessible deeply personal fears and desires.

Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator, with Rosario Guiraldes, Assistant Curator.

Jennifer Wynne Reeves: All Right for Now is made possible by the Jennifer Wynne Reeves Trust; Isabella Hutchinson and Diego Gradowczyk; the Toby Devan Lewis Donor Advised Fund of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland; Fiona and Eric Rudin; Beth Rudin DeWoody and Firooz Zahedi; David Steinhardt; Lee and Louis Reeves; Blick Art Materials, LLC; FM Brush Company; Steve Shane; Dan Lebson and Tom Wilinsky; David Reed; Bernadette Ward and Ladd Forsline, Colorfin; Elena and Holden Stein; and anonymous donors.

Image: Jennifer Wynne Reeves, Bittersweet, 2005. Gouache on paper, 11 x 14 inches. Courtesy of BravinLee Programs.



CATALOGUE
Read Drawing Papers 139: All Right for Now
Buy the catalogue.

The Lab Dec 13, 2018 - Feb 03, 2019

Open Sessions 13

Core Sample

\\Zatara McIntyre, //Untitled//, 2018. Pastel, oil stick, and acrylic on paper, 30 x 23 inches. Courtesy of the artist. \\Zatara McIntyre, //Untitled//, 2018. Pastel, oil stick, and acrylic on paper, 30 x 23 inches. Courtesy of the artist. \\Zatara McIntyre, //Untitled//, 2018. Pastel, oil stick, and acrylic on paper, 30 x 23 inches. Courtesy of the artist.


Zatara McIntyre, Untitled, 2018. Pastel, oil stick, and acrylic on paper, 30 x 23 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

HOLIDAY NOTE: The Drawing Center will be closed Mon, Dec 24 – Tues, Jan 1. We are back in action on Wed, Jan 2. All our exhibitions are on view through February 3, 2019.

A clear line meanders through space, losing speed and direction until it shifts shape, becoming a cloud on a page. Core Sample: Open Sessions 13 explores drawn marks as a way to locate place on a sheet of paper or to suggest the expanse of geospatial time travel. Symbolic gestures borrowed from mythic worlds alongside references to the everyday offer insight into the artists’ varied traditions, identities, and cultures. Core Sample: Open Sessions 13 features the work of Alex Callender, Liz Collins, Dennis RedMoon Darkeem, Zatara McIntyre, Johanna Unzueta, and Cosmo Whyte.


Core Sample is one of five exhibitions presented in The Lab between October 2018 and December 2019 as part of the third cycle of The Drawing Centers Open Sessions program. These thematic group shows are conceived and organized by Rosario Güiraldes and Lisa Sigal, Open Sessions Curators, together with participating artists. In the second year of the program cycle, Open Sessions Curators also organize a full-museum exhibition to which all Open Sessions artists contribute work that best manifests and/or expands the meaning and relevance of drawing today.


Alex Callender lives and works in Northampton, Massachusetts. Her studio practice explores the intersections of myth, identity, and material culture. Through the visual forms of historical narrative, speculative fiction, and repurposed colonial imagery, Callender considers issues of gender, hybridity, and environmental instability. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally, and has completed studio-based residencies with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, The Vermont Studio Center, Urban Glass, DRAWinternational, and the BAU Institute in France.


Liz Collins lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Collins is known for her diverse work in textiles and has, for over two decades, moved fluidly between fields and formats including fashion, craft, performance, and design. Collins’ multimedia installations and textile works have been featured in museums and galleries nationally and internationally, including the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs and the Museum of Arts and Design in New York; as well as group exhibitions at ICA/Boston, the FIT Museum, Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, MoMA, and the New Museum.


Dennis RedMoon Darkeem is a multimedia artist based in the South Bronx, New York, who creates work based on the familiar objects that he sees in his daily travels, discovering elements in architecture and among everyday items found within the home. Darkeem ultimately sets out to express a meaningful story about events in his own life as well as in the lives of others in the communities in which he works. His multimedia works allow for great versatility and a rich viewer experience as the eye uncovers the multiple layers.


Zatara McIntyre lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. McIntyre’s art on paper originates from an impulse to examine the ways in which hybridity and culture manifest through black womanhood. She often utilizes contradictory symbols of deified mythological figures to subvert patriarchal systems of power. Her recent artworks examine the extent to which evocations of female power can perform in an imagined space. She recently attended Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture after earning an MFA at Hunter College.


Johanna Unzueta lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Her drawing practice in fiber and natural materials often references biological observations of life, plants and the sciences, textiles and architecture, trace, and vibrational fields that are more metaphysical than material.


Cosmo Whyte is a multi-disciplinary artist who employs drawing, performance, and sculpture to create conceptual work that explores how notions of identity are disrupted by migration. The Atlanta-based, Jamaican-born artist has shown extensively in the United States and internationally. Recognitions include the Forward Art emerging artist of the year award, the International Sculpture Center’s Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award, Artadia Award, and MOCA GA Working Artist Project award.


Open Sessions is organized by Rosario Güiraldes and Lisa Sigal, Open Sessions Curators.

Open Sessions artists 2018–2020:
Joeun Aatchim; Kenseth Armstead; Bahar Behbahani; Keren Benbenisty; Katarina Burin; Esteban Cabeza de Baca; Alexis Callender; Crystal Z Campbell; Ludovica Carbotta; Jesse Chun; Liz Collins; Mike Crane; Dennis Darkeem; Theodore Darst; Billy and Steven Dufala; Jonathan Ehrenberg; Carolina Fusilier; Rachel Granofsky; LaMont Hamilton; Kunlin He; Victoria Keddie; Young Joo Lee; Lux Lindner; Sharon Madanes; Guadalupe Maravilla; Zatara McIntyre; Ester Partegas; Omid Shekari; Tariku Shiferaw; Johanna Unzueta; Cosmo Whyte.


Open Sessions is made possible by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, the Evelyn Toll Family Foundation, and, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.


Image: Zatara McIntyre, Untitled, (detail), 2018. Pastel, oil stick, and acrylic on paper, 30 x 23 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Stairwell Apr 06, 2018 - Aug 04, 2019

Inka Essenhigh

Manhattanhenge

Image: Installation View, Stairwell. 2018. Photo by Martin Parsekian. Image: Installation View, Stairwell. 2018. Photo by Martin Parsekian. Image: Installation View, Stairwell. 2018. Photo by Martin Parsekian.

Image: Installation View, Stairwell. 2018. Photo by Martin Parsekian.


As part of its ongoing series of commissions for the Stairwell, The Drawing Center has asked New York artist Inka Essenhigh to create a site-specific wall drawing. Essenhigh’s installation is the third in the series, following Gary Simmons’s Ghost Reels (2016–18) and Abdelkader Benchamma’s Dark Matter (2015–16).

An artist whose influences range from Hokusai to Surrealism and Byzantine icons to graphic novels, Inka Essenhigh is known for her hallucinatory scenes that weave narratives about everyday life with otherworldly and science-fiction themes. For her panoramic installation in The Drawing Center’s stairwell, Essenhigh illustrates the story of an imaginary contest staged on a New York City street in which new glass-and-steel condominiums with human attributes engage in a showdown with the city’s more conventional buildings. Drawn directly on the wall, Essenhigh’s anthropomorphic buildings encircle the central motif of the drawing, a golden sunset that replicates “Manhattanhenge”—the effect of the sun when aligned precisely with the city grid—which has long been a mythic part of the city’s monumental architecture.

Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Inka Essenhigh: Manhattanhenge is made possible through the support of Miles McEnery Gallery and Stacey and Rob Goergen.


Image: Installation view of Inka Essenhigh: Manhattanhenge. The Drawing Center, New York, 2018. Photograph by Martin Parsekian.

Lab Corridor Oct 13, 2017 - Feb 03, 2019

Susan York

Foundation

Susan York, //Installation view of Foundation//, The Drawing Center, 2017–2018. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Maris Hutchinson, EPW Studio. Susan York, //Installation view of Foundation//, The Drawing Center, 2017–2018. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Maris Hutchinson, EPW Studio. Susan York, //Installation view of Foundation//, The Drawing Center, 2017–2018. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Maris Hutchinson, EPW Studio.

Susan York, Installation view of Foundation, The Drawing Center, 2017–2018. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Maris Hutchinson, EPW Studio.

For the second long-term installation presented in the Lab Corridor, The Drawing Center presents a site-specific installation by the Santa Fe-based artist Susan York, which references the internal structure of the museum’s 35 Wooster Street building. Using graphite as a sculptural rather than a two-dimensional medium, York created replicas of parts of the museum’s foundation: irregular granite piers that protrude above the museum’s ground floor. Four graphite drawings, each mirroring the appearance of a pier, hang alongside York’s sculptural works, strengthening the ties between drawing and sculpture in her practice. York’s long-term installation initiates an expanded field of activity at The Drawing Center, offering an opportunity to explore drawing as an interactive and socially-minded practice. By bringing attention to The Drawing Center’s building, York’s installation encourages discussion about the importance of museums as public spaces with historical and physical presence.

Organized by Amber Harper, Assistant Curator.

Susan York: Foundation is made possible by the support of Andrew Wallerstein and Mary Sloane; Diane Karp, P.h.D; James Kelly; and an anonymous donor.


Special thanks to Exhibitions 2d – Marfa.


Image: Susan York, Installation view of Foundation, The Drawing Center, 2017–18.