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Main Gallery Jul 15, 2016 - Sep 02, 2016

Gabriel de la Mora

Sound Inscriptions on Fabric

Gabriel de la Mora, //B-189//, 2015. Vintage radio speaker fabric. 17 3/8  x 12 5/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist.
Gabriel de la Mora, //B-189//, 2015. Vintage radio speaker fabric. 17 3/8  x 12 5/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist.
Gabriel de la Mora, //B-189//, 2015. Vintage radio speaker fabric. 17 3/8  x 12 5/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Gabriel de la Mora, B-189, 2015. Vintage radio speaker fabric. 17 3/8 x 12 5/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Gabriel de la Mora is best known for constructing visual works from found, discarded, and obsolete objects, such as eggshells and shoe soles. De la Mora describes these objects, which have outlived their usefulness, as caches for historical information about everyday life. In his exhibition at The Drawing Center, De la Mora will present an installation of fifty-five pairs of found speaker screens. Each screen is imprinted with an inscription created by the dust and air that circulated through the speaker during its life, recording the cadence of countless voices, advertisements, news broadcasts, soap operas, football games, and music, as well as noise, interference, and silence.

Curated by Brett Littman, Executive Director

Gabriel de la Mora: Sound Inscriptions on Fabric is made possible by the support of Sofía Anaya and Rogelio López, José Antonio García Ocejo, Cecilia Anaya and Enrique Gámez, Verónica Anaya, Sicardi Gallery, Houston, and Jack and Anne Moriniere. Additional support is provided by the Mexican Agency for International Development Cooperation (AMEXCID) with the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York and the Consulate General of Mexico in New York (SRE).

Special thanks to Timothy Taylor, London, and Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City.

Image: Gabriel de la Mora, B-189, 2015. Vintage radio speaker fabric. 17 3/8 x 12 5/8 inches. Courtesy of Timothy Taylor, London; Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City; and Sicardi Gallery, Houston.


Upcoming Free Events:

Thursday, August 25, 6:30PM
The Drawing Center will present a second performances organized by Thessia Machado, an artist whose cross-media performance practice addresses the links between sound and drawing.

Drawing Room Jul 15, 2016 - Sep 02, 2016

Open Sessions 7

Hibernating Plan

Sun Moqing, //Neighbor No. 1//, 2016. Ink on object, 4 x 2 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the artist. Sun Moqing, //Neighbor No. 1//, 2016. Ink on object, 4 x 2 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the artist. Sun Moqing, //Neighbor No. 1//, 2016. Ink on object, 4 x 2 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Sun Moqing, Neighbor No. 1, 2016. Ink on object, 4 x 2 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Open Sessions 7: Hibernating Plan is a group exhibition that considers drawing in relationship to the sense of suspended time inherent in planning. Featuring artists Sheree Hovsepian, Rafael Kelman, Arnold Kemp, Thessia Machado, Sun Moqing, Sara Chang Yan, and Tuguldur Yondonjamts, the exhibition explores the notion of the “sketch” in relation to the instinct to hibernate, intuit, and mull over. Including works that feature light, sound, drawing, sculpture, and moving image, Hibernating Plan suggests that drawing exists alongside other forms of knowledge that cannot be exclusively acquired by observation, reason, or experience.

Sheree Hovsepian (b. 1974, Iran) lives and works in New York City. Her work develops from a photographic impulse in which a philosophy is explored and expanded in ways entering formal, sculptural, and material relevance while maintaining a physicality that relates naturally to the artist’s hand.

Rafael Kelman (b. 1986, Vermont) is a New York based artist working across sculpture, drawing, video, and performance. His recent practice has largely revolved around an ongoing project titled Gigantomachy, which explores the collapse, inversion, and manipulation of disparate heroic and utopian fantasies, including those of the lone wolf terrorist, the geodesic dome enthusiast, and the radical mime.

Arnold Joseph Kemp (b. 1968, Boston) is an artist, writer, and educator. His drawings, prints, sculptures, and performances take advantage of an impure aesthetic, incorporating high and low culture, while highlighting practices that probe collective fictions of person and personality.

Thessia Machado (b. 1967, Brazil) lives and works in New York. Her work investigates the physicality of sound and its effect on our perception of space. Through installation, drawing, or sculpture, her pieces revel in the mechanical relationships among things: how they work and are affected by the actions and characteristics of other things.

SUN Moqing (b. 1990, Beijing) lives and works in Beijing and Hamburg. In his work, drawing is not only a still, but also a time-based media. His drawings, photographs, collages, and site-specific works attempt to redistribute space, reflect emptiness, and tell stories about time.

Sara Chang Yan (b. 1982, Lisbon) lives and works in Lisbon. Her practice is focused on drawing and proposes paper as active field, a potential energy that registers on every surface of the work. A multitude of gestures are in relation, alive: as the viewer or the light moves, the work changes. Her drawings also use silence and sound to create a sequence of moments of differing duration.

Tuguldur Yondonjamts (b. 1977, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia) lives and works in New York. His projects are focused on visual research of the space between tamed and untamed worlds, through drawing, sculpture, video, printmaking, and sound experiments.

Curated by Lisa Sigal and Nova Benway

Sun Moqing, Neighbor No. 1, 2016. Ink on object, 4 x 2 ¾ inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Lab Corridor Apr 15, 2016 - Mar 19, 2017

Jackie Ferrara

Lines

Installation View, Lab Corridor. 2016 Installation View, Lab Corridor. 2016 Installation View, Lab Corridor. 2016

Installation View, Lab Corridor. 2016

Jackie Ferrara: Lines consists of eight wall drawings, each anchored by imagined architecture or architectural elements along with lists of film titles rendered in Morse code. The Morse code acts as a foundation or band, interrupting the drawn architecture or adding another layer over the entire surface. The underlying theme of the individual drawings is reflected both in the architectural element or shape dominating the drawing as well as by the Morse code text, which consists of curated lists of films Ferrara began compiling in 1993 that reflect her life-long passion for film. Vampire Towers, for example, depicts nine abstract, dark towers that emerge out of a foundation of vampire film titles veiled in Morse code. This commission reflects the ongoing evolution of Ferrara’s work, incorporating elements of the established language of her sculpture and public art works and bringing them to the walls of The Drawing Center.

Curated by Olga Valle Tetkowski, Exhibition Manager

Jackie Ferrara: Lines is made possible by The Drawing Center’s Exhibition Fund members. Special thanks to Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz.

Photo: Installation View, Lab Corridor. 2016. Photo by Martin Parsekian.

STAIRWELL Apr 10, 2015 - Aug 01, 2016

Abdelkader Benchamma

Representation of Dark Matter

Abdelkader Benchamma, //Representation of Dark Matter//, 2015, Mixed media, Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde, Dubai and galerie du jour agnes b., Paris. (installation photo by Jose Andres Ramirez.) Abdelkader Benchamma, //Representation of Dark Matter//, 2015, Mixed media, Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde, Dubai and galerie du jour agnes b., Paris. (installation photo by Jose Andres Ramirez.) Abdelkader Benchamma, //Representation of Dark Matter//, 2015, Mixed media, Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde, Dubai and galerie du jour agnes b., Paris. (installation photo by Jose Andres Ramirez.)

Abdelkader Benchamma, Representation of Dark Matter, 2015, Mixed media, Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde, Dubai and galerie du jour agnes b., Paris. (installation photo by Jose Andres Ramirez.)


Further activating The Drawing Center's newly designed exhibition spaces, each year an artist will be invited to create a wall drawing in the gallery’s main entryway and stairwell. The Center continues this initiative in April 2015 with a commission by contemporary artist Abdelkader Benchamma (b. 1975, Mazamet, France).

For his first U.S. museum presentation, Abdelkader Benchamma will create an astronomical vortex in the strikingly graphic large-scale drawing, Representation of Dark Matter, 2015. Comprised of a series of linear abstractions and nebulous, inkblot forms the work is a highly articulated depiction of the complexity of the solar system and its nearly imperceptible dark matter. The image’s swirling masses of lines are intricately rendered to resemble scientific illustrations of the Big Bang and explosive cosmic forces. Benchamma’s monochromatic use of such drawing tools as black felt-tip pens, India ink, and charcoal against the gallery wall’s pristine surface will result in a subtle array of tones and textures that straddles the boundaries between figuration and abstraction. As an occult mapping of time and space, this immersive installation gives form to that which is infinitely large and perpetually transforming.

Curated by Joanna Kleinberg Romanow, Adjunct Assistant Curator.

Abdelkader Benchamma: Representation of Dark Matter is made possible by the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde, Dubai and galerie du jour agnes b., Paris.

PRESS
Studio 360 radio on "How Do You Draw Dark Matter".

Image: Abdelkader Benchamma, Representation of Dark Matter, 2015, Mixed media, Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde, Dubai and galerie du jour agnes b., Paris. (Installation photo by Jose Andres Ramirez.)