close

Main Gallery Feb 24, 2018 - Mar 11, 2018

Winter Term

Torkwase Dyson and the Wynter-Wells Drawing School for Environmental Justice

Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017. Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017. Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017.

Torkwase Dyson working in her faculty studio at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 2017.

The Drawing Center is pleased to announce Winter Term, a new annual initiative in which the museum will partner with an artist or organization whose mission it is to explore the transformative role that drawing can play in civic and global society. The yearly program, which will consist of public events, classes, and performances, as well as an exhibition, will build a community of people to investigate the efficacy of drawing as a tool for addressing inequity and encouraging social change. In a world ever more in need of human connection and compassion, Winter Term will ask how drawing, the most universal medium, might extend beyond the gallery space to provide concrete tools for collective engagement and collaboration. In this way, Winter Term provides a new model for exhibition making, as well as for the role that art institutions can play in the real world.

For the first session, which will take place from February 24 through March 11, 2018, The Drawing Center has invited artist Torkwase Dyson to create an installation and organize a two-week series of classes, discussions, and formal experiments developed from her incipient project the Wynter-Wells Drawing School for Environmental Justice—named for Jamaican writer Sylvia Wynter and American Civil Rights leader Ida B. Wells. The School will present an experimental curriculum employing techniques culled from the visual arts as well as design theories of geography, infrastructure, engineering, and architecture to initiate dialogue about geography and spatiality in an era of global crisis due to human-induced climate change. Participation in each class will be by application only (the afternoon sessions will be open to observation by the public). Drawings and sculptures by Dyson will be on view throughout the program’s run and Dyson will present during select “office hours” to discuss her work and the school with the public.

During an open studio-style installation, Dyson will explicate her own formal concept of “Black Compositional Thought” while terms such as improvisation, nomadicity, and re-orientation will be applied to techniques within abstract drawing that confront issues of environmental justice and the path towards a more equitable future. Confirmed invited guests include architect and author Mario Gooden; curator Rujeko Hockley; artist and designer Ekene Ijeoma; designer, artist, and urbanist Ron Morrison; professor and author Christina Sharpe; and architect and author Mabel O. Wilson. In addition, artist Andres Luis Hernandez will create a drawing score to which artist Zachary Fabri will respond in movement. The result of their collaboration will be documented in drawings and photography.

Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator


APPLICATION FOR WINTER TERM CLASSES

Participation in the morning session of each class is by application only (applications are now closed). Class capacity is 20. The afternoon sessions are open to observation by the public. Applications are open through Friday, January 19. Course participants will be announced on Monday, February 12.


Class Schedule
Tue, Feb 27; Fri, Mar 2; and Wed, Mar 7. Scroll down for details
Times for all classes: 10am-3pm with a break between Noon-1pm
10am to Noon - open to participants only
1pm to 3pm - open to participants and the public to observe


PROGRAM: WYNTER-WELLS DRAWING SCHOOL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE


On View:
Drawings and sculptures by Dyson will be on view in the Main Gallery and Drawing Room. In addition, there will be books from Dyson’s library for perusal, as well as articles and reference material related to the issues under discussion.


Saturday, February 24
Torkwase Dyson will hold office hours from 12:00pm to 4:00pm in the Main Gallery. Additional office hours will be held on the following dates: Sunday, February 25; Thursday, March 1; Saturday, March 3; and Sunday, March 4.


Saturday, February 24 at 6pm
RSVP via eventbrite here
Conversation between Torkwase Dyson and Christina Sharpe, professor at Tufts University and author of In the Wake: On Blackness and Being and Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects.


Tuesday, February 27
10am to Noon OPEN TO PARTICIPANTS ONLY
1pm to 3pm OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WITH ADMISSION
Class 1: Global Warming, Uneven Development and New Geographies: What is Global Warming? What is Climate Change? How are they different and what do they have to do with uneven development and geography? This class will address these questions through drawing as it relates to time, motion, and transparency.


Thursday, March 1 at 6pm
RSVP via eventbrite here
Panel discussion on North African nomadic architecture and other models of self-emancipation through architecture and design. With Ekene Ijeoma, Ron Morrison, and Mabel O. Wilson. Moderated by Rujeko Hockley.


Friday, March 2
10am to Noon OPEN TO PARTICIPANTS ONLY
1pm to 3pm OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WITH ADMISSION
This class is co-taught by architect and author Mario Gooden.
Class 2: Architecture and Liquidity: What types of energy are available to us and why should we diversify and use less? This class will investigate diverse sources of energy and their site-specific pros and cons. As a drawing project, it will consider hydroelectric power and gravitational potential energy as a way to examine state changes in matter and liquid. In addition, it will use the fundamental logic of elevation drawing to think through the science of water and the way in which it shapes space.


Wednesday, March 7
10am to Noon OPEN TO PARTICIPANTS ONLY
1pm to 3pm OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WITH ADMISSION
This class is co-taught by Andres Luis Hernandez.
Class 3: Nomadicity, Movement, and Improvisation: At a time when mass migration due to the effects of climate change is a critical question, artist and designer Andres L. Hernandez will guide the class through drawing as an interpretative act of movement. Dyson will hold a post activity discussion about nomadicity, movement, and improvisation inspired by the topic of self-emancipation through nomadic architecture, particularly that of North Africa. At the end of the day, the class will respond by exploring the notion of the perfect curve while listening to a playlist created by DJ Jet Toomer.


Friday, March 9, 6pm to 8pm
Closing reception


Winter Term 2018: Torkwase Dyson and the Wynter-Wells Drawing School for Environmental Justice is made possible by Lisa Silver and Jean-Christophe Castelli, and Isabel Stainow Wilcox.

Main Gallery Apr 06, 2018 - Aug 12, 2018

Terry Winters

Facts and Fictions

Terry Winters, //7-Fold Sequence, One//, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Terry Winters, //7-Fold Sequence, One//, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Terry Winters, //7-Fold Sequence, One//, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Terry Winters, 7-Fold Sequence, One, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

PRESS Read about Terry Winters: Facts and Fictions via Artforum


A leading figure in the art world for four decades, Terry Winters became well known in the 1980s for his materially-conscious drawings and paintings. Representing the patterns and schema that undergird physical and intellectual life—French philosopher Gilles Deleuze is cited as an important reference—Winters’s drawings of grids, networks, and knots illustrate complex encounters between biological drives, technological systems, and mental processes. The Drawing Center’s Main Gallery will present an overview of Winters’s drawings from 1980 to the present including full cycles of drawings as well as a selection of large-scale works on paper that foreground the overarching theme of Winters’s practice: the desire to make sense, however fictively, of the manner in which the visible world is constructed and received. Rather than offering a comprehensive drawing retrospective, the show will be organized with an eye to morphological relationships so that, as viewers move through the gallery, they will recall and ideally return to earlier related images.

Organized by Claire Gilman, Chief Curator.



Terry Winters: Facts and Fictions
is made possible by Jack Shear; Agnes Gund; Kathy and Richard Fuld; Ellsworth Kelly Foundation; Waqas Wajahat; and Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson.


Special thanks to Matthew Marks Gallery, New York.


Image: Terry Winters, 7-Fold Sequence, One, 2008. Graphite on paper, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Drawing Room Apr 06, 2018 - Jul 29, 2018

Hipkiss

Bulwark

Hipkiss, From left: //Bulwark #2, #3, #6, #8, and #9// from //The Towers//, 2017. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 paper, 89 x 16 inches, each. Courtesy of the artists.  Hipkiss, From left: //Bulwark #2, #3, #6, #8, and #9// from //The Towers//, 2017. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 paper, 89 x 16 inches, each. Courtesy of the artists.  Hipkiss, From left: //Bulwark #2, #3, #6, #8, and #9// from //The Towers//, 2017. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 paper, 89 x 16 inches, each. Courtesy of the artists.

Hipkiss, From left: Bulwark #2, #3, #6, #8, and #9 from The Towers, 2017. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 paper, 89 x 16 inches, each. Courtesy of the artists.

Praised for their meticulously-detailed panoramic landscapes, Anglo-French artists Alpha and Chris Mason, known collectively as Hipkiss, have been collaborating for three decades on intricate drawings that interweave dystopian narratives with a personal lexicon of symbolic forms. Past works by Hipkiss chronicle fictional histories of warring clans, urban crusades, and quasi-apocalyptical societies. For Bulwark, the artists’ first solo museum show in New York, Hipkiss will present the most recent cycle of drawings in their series The Towers (2015–ongoing). The drawings pull from the myriad allegorical significance of towers as symbols for transcendence, irrational ambition, and piety.

Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Hipkiss: Bulwark is made possible by Fiona and Eric Rudin.

Hipkiss, From left: Bulwark #2, #3, #6, #8, and #9 from The Towers, 2017. Graphite, silver ink, silver tape, and metal leaf on Fabriano 4 paper, 89 x 16 inches, each. Courtesy of the artists.

The Lab Apr 06, 2018 - Apr 22, 2018

Eduardo Navarro

Into Ourselves

The Drawing Center has commissioned Into Ourselves, a new short-term project by Argentinian artist Eduardo Navarro for The Lab which will open on April 6, 2018. Navarro will produce a new series of edible drawings, inspired by quantum physics––specifically the “holographic principle,” which describes how information in the universe can only be scrambled but never destroyed.

The drawings will be placed on shelves with red “heat lamps.” During the course of the exhibition, a soup will be made that will dissolve the drawings to make them digestible. Into Ourselves also explores the idea of shifting our understanding of aesthetic primacy away from the eye and the world of ideas to metabolism, and the stomach.

Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Into Ourselves has been jointly developed by The Drawing Center and der TANK. It was shown for the first time in November 2017 at der TANK, and has been produced thanks to the support of Nara Roesler and the Consulate General of Argentina in New York.

Image: Eduardo Navarro, Into Ourselves, A4 drawing on edible paper with edible ink 2017.

Stairwell Apr 06, 2018 - Feb 24, 2019

Inka Essenhigh

Manhattanhenge

Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016. Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016. Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016.

Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center, 2016.


As part of its ongoing series of commissions for the Stairwell, The Drawing Center has asked New York artist Inka Essenhigh to create a site-specific wall drawing. Essenhigh’s installation will be the third in the series, following Gary Simmons’s Ghost Reels (2016–18) and Abdelkader Benchamma’s Dark Matter (2015–16).

An artist whose influences range from Hokusai to Surrealism and Byzantine icons to graphic novels, Inka Essenhigh is known for her hallucinatory scenes that weave narratives about everyday life with otherworldly and science-fiction themes. For her panoramic installation in The Drawing Center’s stairwell, Essenhigh will illustrate the story of an imaginary contest staged on a New York City street in which new glass-and-steel condominiums with human attributes engage in a showdown with the city’s more conventional buildings. Drawn directly on the wall, Essenhigh’s anthropomorphic buildings will encircle the central motif of the drawing, a golden sunset that replicates “Manhattanhenge”—the effect of the sun when aligned precisely with the city grid—which has long been a mythic part of the city’s monumental architecture

Organized by Brett Littman, Executive Director.

Image: Inka Essenhigh, Drawing for long-term installation at The Drawing Center (detail), 2016.