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Michael Iovenko School Programs

The Drawing Center's Michael Iovenko School Programs invite students to embark on a visual discovery process of the magic of drawing. Since 1980, the Center has reached out to young people by providing discussion and art-making activities inspired by its exhibitions of historical and contemporary drawings.

This unique museum experience is enhanced by the Center's intimate gallery setting. The Drawing Center currently offers two programs comprised of on-site and in-school activities that are free of charge and serve K-12 New York City public school students. Activities foster the development of visual-thinking skills and comply with the New York State Learning Standards in the Arts.

D.R.A.W.

Draw and Reflect Art Workshop

This on-site workshop engages students with The Drawing Center's exhibitions through a guided tour and hands-on project. Specific works will be discussed in detail in order to practice sustained observation and encourage more personal and thoughtful responses.

The art-making project will take place in the galleries as well, continuing the students' immersion with the work and enabling experimentation with visual concepts. This on-site workshop engages students with The Drawing Center's exhibitions through a guided tour and hands-on project. Specific works will be discussed in detail in order to practice sustained observation and encourage more personal and thoughtful responses. The art-making project will take place in the galleries as well, continuing the students' immersion with the work and enabling experimentation with visual concepts.

School Tour Reservation Form :  

Drawing Connections

Through this program, The Drawing Center partners with four neighboring Lower Manhattan public schools to provide students with an in-depth visual art experience. Incorporating a gallery visit and five in-school sessions, Drawing Connections will culminate in an exhibition of the students' artwork in the Center's galleries. A teaching artist will be paired with a classroom teacher for the duration of the program and will develop a project that relates both to topics currently covered in the classroom and to exhibitions on view in the Drawing Room. Students will benefit from guided instruction with a teaching artist and enjoy the accomplishment of seeing their work displayed in a professional museum setting. Each spring, The Drawing Center will exhibit the students' drawings in the galleries and host a special reception for students, teachers, and parents.

Drawing Out
Student Artwork from the Drawing Connections Program
June 9-12, 2016
The Lab
Reception: Friday, June, 10 5-7pm


On view in The Lab from June 9–12, 2016, will be student artwork from the Drawing Connections program, which pairs practicing artists with teachers in Lower Manhattan public schools to develop projects that relate classroom curricula to exhibitions at The Drawing Center. Now in its twelfth year, Drawing Out features artwork by approximately 100 students from four classes in the participating schools of: P.S. 42 Benjamin Altman School, P.S. 130 Hernando Desoto School, Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School, and Broome Street Academy.

At P.S. 42 Benjamin Altman School, third-grade students in Marie DiSilvestro’s class worked with teaching artist Maria Hupfield. The exhibition Richard Pousette – Dart: 1930s, presented his early drawings, directly-carved sculptures and other works on paper reflecting the artist’s concerns with 3-dimensional space, volume, and figural orientation in his studies of mythology, animals, and the body in motion through dance and sports. Learning from Pousette-Dart’s examples, students engaged their in-class curriculum on early Mesoamerican, particularly Mexican cultures, by making abstract geometric drawings of a chosen spiritual totem or animal using oil pastel and watercolor. From this activity reflecting Pousette-Dart’s approach in his own early art works, students were able to relate themselves to Mexican culture to think about how different perceptions are connected across time and cultures.

Scott Fowler’s Graphic Design and Illustration class for Juniors at the Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School, visited the current exhibition Drawing Dialogues: Selections from the Sol LeWitt Collection. During the museum visit led by teaching artist Kim Charles Kay, students began to understand and build a definition of Conceptual Art by considering how this collection speaks to the character and nature of Sol LeWitt as an artist and a collector; and provides a historical view into the cross-conversation active amongst LeWitt and his peers during the 1960’s and 70’s. Students investigate mark-making and develop strategies in unexpected materials and formats towards the development of their final projects.

Second-grade students in Vickiana De Los Santos’ class at P.S. 130 Hernando De Soto School led by teaching artist Maria Hupfield visited the exhibition Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture. The site-specific architectural installation and series of large-scale drawings were inspired by Despont’s life in Bali, sacred geometry, mandalas and her ideas of drawing as a diagram of energy and forces. Students observed Despont’s signature style of mark making using layers of architectural stencils over gridded paper, and lines representing human body. For final works, students chose a significant geographical place of interest in NYC and translated their site investigations into their own visual vocabularies of color and form producing drawings that combine transportation systems, built environments, and invisible energy transitions.

Led by teaching artist Kim Charles Kay, Broome Street Academy Charter High School’s Journalism class taught by Kimberly Adams visited the exhibition Rashid Johnson: Anxious Men. Learning from Johnson’s site-specific installation, students were introduced to questions of race and political identity through a series of black-soap-and-wax-on-tile portraits. Students discussed Johnson’s significant influencers of family in the development of his art works. In response to the exhibition, students identified through creative writing exercises and the use of triangular mapping, three major influential elements in their own lives. Drawings of personal iconography and their writings on selfhood will be combined and on display as handmade zines.