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Michael Iovenko School Programs

The Drawing Center's Michael Iovenko School Programs invite students to embark on a visual discovery process of the magic of drawing. Since 1980, the Center has reached out to young people by providing discussion and art-making activities inspired by its exhibitions of historical and contemporary drawings.

This unique museum experience is enhanced by the Center's intimate gallery setting. The Drawing Center currently offers two programs comprised of on-site and in-school activities that are free of charge and serve K-12 New York City public school students. Activities foster the development of visual-thinking skills and comply with the New York State Learning Standards in the Arts.

D.R.A.W.

Draw and Reflect Art Workshop

This on-site workshop engages students with The Drawing Center's exhibitions through a guided tour and hands-on project. Specific works will be discussed in detail in order to practice sustained observation and encourage more personal and thoughtful responses.

The art-making project will take place in the galleries as well, continuing the students' immersion with the work and enabling experimentation with visual concepts. This on-site workshop engages students with The Drawing Center's exhibitions through a guided tour and hands-on project. Specific works will be discussed in detail in order to practice sustained observation and encourage more personal and thoughtful responses. The art-making project will take place in the galleries as well, continuing the students' immersion with the work and enabling experimentation with visual concepts.

School Tour Reservation Form :  

Drawing Connections

Through this program, The Drawing Center partners with four neighboring Lower Manhattan public schools to provide students with an in-depth visual art experience. Incorporating a gallery visit and five in-school sessions, Drawing Connections will culminate in an exhibition of the students' artwork in the Center's galleries. A teaching artist will be paired with a classroom teacher for the duration of the program and will develop a project that relates both to topics currently covered in the classroom and to exhibitions on view in the Drawing Room. Students will benefit from guided instruction with a teaching artist and enjoy the accomplishment of seeing their work displayed in a professional museum setting. Each spring, The Drawing Center will exhibit the students' drawings in the galleries and host a special reception for students, teachers, and parents.

Drawing Out
Student Artwork from the Drawing Connections Program
June 17-22, 2014
Drawing Room I The Lab
Reception: Thursday, June 19, 5-7pm


On view in The Lab from June 17-22, 2014, the exhibition features student artwork from the Drawing Connections program, which pairs practicing artists with teachers in Lower Manhattan public schools to develop projects that relate classroom curricula to exhibitions at The Drawing Center. Now in its tenth year, Drawing Out features group projects by approximately 100 students from four classes in the participating schools of: P.S. 42 Benjamin Altman School, P.S. 130 Hernando Desoto School, Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School, and Broome Street Academy.

At P.S. 42 Benjamin Altman School, third-grade students in Marie DiSilvestro’s class worked with
teaching artist Maria Hupfield. Students visited the exhibition Len Lye, Motion Sketch and learned about how various drawing processes used by Lye, including drawing from observation and “doodling,” embodied and enacted movement. Students created a number of studies in different materials; their final drawings, titled Life Force, are based on their own small “tangible: plant” sculptures by connecting movement, sound, time, light and connecting them with drawn lines and shapes in various colors.

Led by teaching artist Maria Hupfield, second-grade students in April McConnell’s class at P.S. 130 Hernando DeSoto School responded to the exhibition Ferran Adria, Notes on Creativity. They began by understanding how Adria uses sketches, composition and subject matter to create meaning in his everyday life. Students produced a variety of drawings and clay visualizations to use creativity to better understand themselves as learners.

Scott Fowler’s Graphic Design and Illustration class of eleventh graders at Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School, led by teaching artist Kim Charles Kay, was inspired by the work of Lebbeus Woods to address the damage left by Hurricane Sandy. Students looked at Woods’s notebooks, drawings and architectural models which exemplified psychological implications of rebuilding after war and/or natural disasters. Having learned about one point perspective, students built their drawings on images from the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

Students of James Ifill’s Broome Street Academy Global Studies class visited the exhibition Deborah Grant, Christ You Know it Ain’t Easy!!, armed with the question “Who tells the story?” Reflecting upon Deborah Grant’s work, these high school students discussed the impact of history on their personal stories. They contextualized modernism within WWI and WWII, and created collaged drawings on basswood panels under the guidance of teaching artist, Maria Hupfield.