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Education

D.R.A.W.

Draw and Reflect Art Workshop

This on-site workshop engages students with The Drawing Center's exhibitions through a guided tour and hands-on project. Specific works will be discussed in detail in order to practice sustained observation and encourage more personal and thoughtful responses.

The art-making project will take place in the galleries as well, continuing the students' immersion with the work and enabling experimentation with visual concepts. This on-site workshop engages students with The Drawing Center's exhibitions through a guided tour and hands-on project. Specific works will be discussed in detail in order to practice sustained observation and encourage more personal and thoughtful responses. The art-making project will take place in the galleries as well, continuing the students' immersion with the work and enabling experimentation with visual concepts.

School Tour Reservation Form :  

Drawing Connections

Through this program, The Drawing Center partners with four neighboring Lower Manhattan public schools to provide students with an in-depth visual art experience. Incorporating a gallery visit and five in-school sessions, Drawing Connections will culminate in an exhibition of the students' artwork in the Center's galleries. A teaching artist will be paired with a classroom teacher for the duration of the program and will develop a project that relates both to topics currently covered in the classroom and to exhibitions on view in the Drawing Room. Students will benefit from guided instruction with a teaching artist and enjoy the accomplishment of seeing their work displayed in a professional museum setting. Each spring, The Drawing Center will exhibit the students' drawings in the galleries and host a special reception for students, teachers, and parents.

Drawing Out
Student Artwork from the Drawing Connections Program
May 21-26, 2015
The Lab
Reception: Thursday, May 21, 5-7pm


On view in The Lab from May 21-26, 2015, will be student artwork from the Drawing Connections program, which pairs practicing artists with teachers in Lower Manhattan public schools to develop projects that relate classroom curricula to exhibitions at The Drawing Center. Now in its eleventh year, Drawing Out features artwork by approximately 100 students from four classes in the participating schools of: P.S. 42 Benjamin Altman School, P.S. 130 Hernando Desoto School, Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School, and Broome Street Academy.

At P.S. 42 Benjamin Altman School, third-grade students in Marie DiSilvestro’s class worked with
teaching artist Maria Hupfield. Students visited the exhibition Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm and began a discussion exploring the origins of fairytales, Frank’s bold use of pastel and gouache, decoration, and composition. Students learned to “read” the drawings for details, setting, tone and scene changes. Students were encouraged to explore the content and visual meaning in the artist’s drawings and compared how to construct meaning in writing and drawing. Combining pastel and gouache, students created vibrant and expressive scenes in their final drawings based on a series of Frank’s drawings inspired by the Cinderella story.

Scott Fowler’s Graphic Design and Illustration class for juniors at Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School, led by teaching artist Kim Charles Kay, visited the exhibition Thread Lines. Students were able to learn how artists incorporated sewing, knitting, and weaving as unconventional ways to draw. Connecting closely to their current curriculum which included Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and Animate, students were asked to contemplate and compare the use of line within the tradition of textiles to drawing digitally. Using organza, thread and felt, students created final projects exploring formal concerns of line weight, composition, collage and materiality in their constructed drawings.

Led by teaching artist Maria Hupfield, second-grade students in April McConnell’s class at P.S. 130 Hernando DeSoto School responded to the exhibition Portraits from the École des Beaux-Arts. They began by understanding the definition of portraiture and how portraits reflect the representation of self and others. Looking at Portraits from the École des Beaux-Arts as an historical timeline, students understood the range of purposes that portraiture has taken from capturing a likeness, to announcing one’s status or profession in life, to observations of gesture, scene, and expression. Students created partner portrait drawings of one another using pastel on construction paper in complimentary colors.

Broome Street Academy Journalism high school class visited the exhibition Tomi Ungerer: All in One. Learning from Ungerer’s eclectic artistic style and his acute social awareness, students were asked to understand the powerful usage of satire as seen in Ungerer’s Columbia University commissioned protest posters from 1960’s. Discussions linking photo journalism to the language of propaganda, advertising, bias and credibility set the framework for students to make their own political posters on contemporary social justice issues.